Formula Support

Setting cell type of a cell to FormulaCell will allow to enter algebraic expressions using formulas and cell references. Formula cells can be used for every cell in a grid or just for a few cells. If the cell value starts with an equal sign, then the cell is considered as a formula cell and its contents are treated as such.

//Setting Formula cell for a particular cell
this.gridControl1[2, 2].CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell;
'Setting Formula cell for a particular cell
Me.gridControl1(2, 2).CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell

Operators

The current formula support will allow well-formed parenthetical algebraic expressions with operators and operands. The 10 supported operators are shown in the following precedence table.

Operations Symbol Calculation Precedence
Multiplication * 1st
Division / 1st
Addition + 2nd
Subtraction - 2nd
Less Than < 3rd
Greater Than > 3rd
Equal = 3rd
Less Than or Equal <= 3rd
Greater Than or Equal >= 3rd
Not Equal != 3rd

The supported operands include those listed in the following table. An operand by itself is also a well-formed algebraic expression that can serve as an entire formula in a cell. Within a formula cell, case is ignored. So, a1 is the same as A1, and Cos(3) is the same as COS(3).

Operand Example
Number 532.1, -10.2, or 18.
cell reference A12, BB1010, or Q18
library formula with valid arguments Abs(E14), Cos(-3.14), or Sum(A1:A14)
any well-formed algebraic expression E1+E2, Cos(2)<A4, or Abs(A1-A5).

Architecture

Formula Cell control is implemented with four classes. GridFormulaCellModel, GridFormulaCellRenderer, GridFormulaEngine and GridFormulaTag.
GridFormulaCellModel class does some significant work in itsGetFormattedText method override where calculations and formula parsing are initiated dynamically.
GridFormulaCellRenderer class handles a couple of activation methods that are specific for displaying formulas when a formula cell is activated.
GridFormulaEngine class does the actual parsing and calculation that is required to evaluate a formula in a cell. This class also maintains Formula Library.
GridFormulaTag class is used in conjunction withGridStyleInfo class that has a property of this type. GridFormulaTag tracks computed value of the cell in its Text property.

Supported Functions

This section explains the list of library functions that are shipped in the GridFormulaEngine.

ABS

Returns the absolute value of a number. The absolute value of a non-negative number is the number itself. The absolute value of a negative number is -1 times the number.

Syntax

ABS(number),

Where:

  • Number is the real number for which you want the absolute value.

ACCRINT

ACCRINT function returns the accrued interest for a security that pays periodic interest.

Syntax

ACCRINT(issue, first_interest, settlement, rate, par, frequency, [basis], [calc_method])

Where:

  • issue - security’s issue date.
  • first_interest- security’s first interest date.
  • settlement - security’s settlement date. The security settlement date is the date after the issue date when the security is traded to the buyer.
  • rate - security’s annual coupon rate.
  • par - security’s par value.
  • frequency - number of coupon payments per year.

ACCRINTM

Returns the accrued interest for a security that pays maturity interest.

Syntax

ACCRINTM(issue, settlement, rate, par, [basis])

Where:

  • issue - security’s issue date.
  • settlement - security’s settlement date. The security settlement date is the date after the issue date when the security is traded to the buyer.
  • rate - security’s annual coupon rate.
  • par - security’s par value.

ACOS

Returns the inverse cosine of a number. Inverse cosine is also referred to as arccosine. The arccosine is the angle whose cosine is the given number. The returned angle is given in radians in the range of 0 to pi.

Syntax

ACOS(number),

Where:

  • number is the cosine of the angle that you want and must be between -1 and 1.

ACOSH

Returns the inverse hyperbolic cosine of a number. The number must be greater than or equal to 1. The inverse hyperbolic cosine is the value whose hyperbolic cosine is the given number.

Syntax

ACOSH(number),

Where:

  • number is any real number that is greater than or equal to 1.

ACOT

ACOT function retrieves the principal value of the inverse cotangent or arctangent of a number.

Syntax

ACOT(number)

Where:

  • number is the cotangent of the angle you need.

ACOTH

ACOTH function retrieves the inverse hyperbolic cotangent of a value.

Syntax

ACOTH(number)

Where:

  • number is the cotangent of the angle you need.

ACSCH

ACSCH function computes inverse hyperbolic cosecant of its argument.

Syntax

x = acsch(y)

Where:

  • x is a complex or real array
  • y is a complex or real array

ADDRESS

ADDRESS function returns the address of a cell in a worksheet given specified row and column numbers.

Syntax

ADDRESS(row_number, column_number, [abs_number], [a1], [sheet_text])

Where:

  • row_number: A numeric value that specifies the row number.
  • column_number: A numeric value that specifies the column number
  • abs_number: Optional. A numeric value that specifies the type of reference to return.

AND

Returns True if all the arguments have a logical value of true and returns False if at least one argument is false.

Syntax

AND(logical1, logical2, …),

Where:

  • logical1, logical2, … are multiple conditions you want to test for True or False.

ARABIC

A Roman numeral has been converted to an Arabic numeral.

Syntax

ARABIC( text ),

where:

  • text which needs to be converted.

AREAS

The AREAS function returns the number of areas that make up the reference.

Syntax

AREAS(reference)

Where:

  • reference is an input argument.

ASC

The ASC function changes the double-byte characters to single-byte characters for DBCS languages.

Syntax

ASC(text)

Where:

  • text is the text you want to change.

ASECH

ASECH function computes element-wise inverse hyperbolic secant of the argument.

Syntax

x = asech(y)

Where:

  • x is a complex or real array.
  • y is a complex or real array.

ASIN

Returns the inverse sine of a number. Inverse sine is also referred to as arcsine. The arcsine is the angle whose sine is the given number. The returned angle is given in radians in the range from -pi/2 to +pi/2.

Syntax

ASIN(number)

Where:

  • number is the sine of the angle that you want and must be between -1 and 1.

ASINH

Returns the inverse hyperbolic sine of a number. The inverse hyperbolic sine is the value whose hyperbolic sine is the given number, so ASINH(SINH(number)) equals number.

Syntax

ASINH(number)

Where:

  • number is any real number.

ATAN

Returns the inverse tangent of a number. Inverse tangent is also known as arctangent. The arctangent is the angle whose tangent is a number. The returned angle is given in radians in the range from -pi/2 to +pi/2.

Syntax

ATAN(number)

Where:

  • number is the tangent of the angle that you want.

ATAN2

Returns the inverse tangent of the specified x- and y-coordinates. The arctangent is the angle from the x-axis to a line containing the origin (0, 0) and the point (x_number, y_number). The angle is given in radians between -pi and pi, excluding -pi.

Syntax

ATAN2(x_number,y_number)

Where:

  • x_number is the X coordinate of the point.
  • y_number is the Y coordinate of the point.

ATANH

Returns the inverse hyperbolic tangent of a number. Number must be strictly between -1 and 1. The inverse hyperbolic tangent is the value whose hyperbolic tangent is a number, so ATANH(TANH(number)) equals the given number.

Syntax

ATANH(number)

Where:

  • number is any real number that is between 1 and -1.

AVEDEV

Returns the average of absolute mean deviations of data points. AVEDEV is a measure of variability in a data set.

Syntax

AVEDEV(number1, number2, …)

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are arguments for which you want the average of the absolute deviations. You can also use a single array or a reference to an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

AVERAGE

Returns the average (arithmetic mean) of the arguments.

Syntax

AVERAGE(number1, number2, …)

Where:

  • number1,number2, … are numeric arguments for which you want the average.

AVERAGEA

Calculates the average (arithmetic mean) of the values in the list of arguments. In addition to numbers and text logical values such as True and False are also included in the calculation.

Syntax

AVERAGEA(value1, value2, …)

Where:

  • value1, value2, … are cells, ranges of cells, or values for which you want the average.

AVERAGEIF

AVERAGEIF function finds the average of values in a given array that satisfies the given criteria, and returns the average value of the corresponding values in a second given array.

Syntax

=AVERAGEIF(range, criteria, average_range)

Where:

  • range - Array of values to be tested against the given criteria.
  • criteria - The condition to be tested in each of the values of the given range.
  • average_range- Numeric values to be evaluated against the criteria and averaged.

AVERAGEIFS

AVERAGEIFS function finds the average of values in a given array that satisfies a set of given criteria.

Syntax

= AVERAGEIFS( average_range, criteria_range1, criteria1, [criteria_range2, criteria2], … )

Where:

  • average_range -Specific set of values to be averaged if the criteria range meets the provided criteria.
  • criteria_range1- Array of values to be tested against the given criteria.
  • criteria1 - The condition to be tested on each of the values of the given range.

AVG

Returns the average (arithmetic mean) of the arguments.

Syntax

AVG(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are numeric arguments for which you want the average.

BASE

A number has been converted into a text representation with the given radix (base).

Syntax

BASE(Number, Radix [Min_length])

Where:

  • Number is the value that you want to convert.
  • Radix is the base radix that you want to convert the number into.
  • Min_length is the minimum length of the returned string. Min_length is optional.

BESSELI

The BESSELI function calculates the modified Bessel functions. These functions are the equivalent of the Bessel functions, evaluated for purely imaginary arguments.

Syntax

BESSELI(a,n)

Where:

  • a is the value that evaluates the function.
  • n is the order of the Bessel function.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if a or n is non-numeric

#NUM! - occurs if n < 0

BESSELJ

The BESSELJ function calculates the Bessel function, Jn(x), for a specified order and a given value of x.

Syntax

BESSELJ(a,n)

Where

  • a is the value that evaluates the function.
  • n is the order of the Bessel function.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if a or n is non-numeric

#NUM! - occurs if n < 0

BESSELY

The BESSELY function calculates for a specified order and value of x.

Syntax

BESSELY(a,n)

Where:

  • a is the value that evaluates the function.
  • n is the order of the Bessel function.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if a or n is non-numeric

#NUM! - occurs if n < 0

BESSELK

The BESSELK function retrieves the modified Bessel function K n(x), which is equivalent to the Bessel functions evaluated for purely imaginary arguments.

Syntax

BESSELK(x,n)

where

  • x is the value that evaluates the function.
  • n is the order of the Bessel function.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if a or n is non-numeric

#NUM!- occurs if n < 0

BETA.DIST

The BETA.DIST function returns the beta distribution which is commonly used to study variation in the percentage of something.

Syntax

BETA.DIST( x, alpha, beta, cumulative, [A], [B] )

Where:

  • x is the function of calculate the value between [A] and [B].
  • alpha is a parameter of the distribution.
  • beta is a parameter of the distribution.
  • cumulative is a logical argument that specifies the type of distribution to be used. If it is True returns the cumulative distribution else it returns the probability density function.
  • [A]-Optional argument which is lower bound of the interval of x.
  • [B]-Optional argument which is upper bound of the interval of x.

BIGMUL

BIGMUL function gives the full value of multiplying two 32-bit numbers.

Syntax

Math.BigMul(x,y);

Where:

  • x is the first number to multiply
  • y is the second number to multiply.

BIN2DEC

The BIN2DEC function converts a binary number into a decimal number.

Syntax

BIN2DEC(number)

Where:

  • number is the binary number that you want to convert.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number is not a valid binary number, or if number contains more than 10 characters.

BIN2OCT

The BIN2OCT function converts a binary number into an octal number.

Syntax

BIN2OCT(number, places)

Where:

  • number is the decimal integer you want to convert.
  • places is the number of characters to use.

BIN2HEX

The BIN2HEX function converts a binary number into a hexadecimal.

Syntax

BIN2HEX(number places)

Where:

  • number is the decimal integer you want to convert.
  • places is the number of characters to use.

Remarks

#NUM! - occurs if number is not a valid binary number, if places is negative.

#VALUE! - occurs if places is non-numeric.

BINOM.DIST

The BINOM.DIST function returns the Binomial Distribution probability for a given number of successes from a specified number of trials.

Syntax

BINOM.DIST (trial number,success_probability,value, cumulative)

Where

  • trial number is the number of Bernoulli trials.
  • success_probability is the probability of a success on each trial.
  • value is the criterion value.
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of the function.

Remarks

#NUM! - occurs if trial number is less than zero, if success_probability and value is less than zero or greater one.

#VALUE! - occurs if trials, success_probability and value are non-numeric.

BINOMDIST

Returns the individual term binomial distribution probability.

Syntax

BINOMDIST(number_s, trials, probability_s, cumulative)

Where:

  • number_s is the number of successes in trials.
  • trials is the number of independent trials.
  • probability_s is the probability of success on each trial.

BINOM.INV

BINOM.INV function returns the smallest value for which the cumulative binomial distribution is greater than or equal to a criterion value.

Syntax

BINOM.INV(trials, probability_s, alpha)

Where:

  • trials is the number of Bernoulli trials.
  • probability_s is the probability of a success on each trial.
  • alpha is the criterion value.

BITAND

The BITAND function returns a bitwise ‘AND’ of two numbers.

Syntax

BITAND(num1,num2)

Where:

  • num1 and num2 should be in decimal format.

Remarks

#NUM! - occurs if num1 or num2 is less than zero, if num1 or num2 is a non-integer or is greater than (2^48)-1.

#VALUE! - occurs if num1 or num2 is a non-numeric value.

BITLSHIFT

The BITLSHIFT function retrieves a number shifted left by the specified number of bits.

Syntax

BITLSHIFT(num1,num2)

Where:

  • num1 must be an integer greater than or equal to 0.
  • num2 must be an integer.

Remarks

#NUM! - occurs if num1 or num2 is less than zero, if num1 or num2 is a non-integer or is greater than (2^48)-1.

#VALUE! - occurs if num1 or num2 is a non-numeric value.

BITOR

The BITOR function retrieves a bitwise OR of two numbers.

Syntax

BITOR(num1, num2)

Where:

  • num1 and num2 should be in decimal format.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if num1 or num2 is less than zero, if num1 or num2 is a non-integer or is greater than (2^48)-1.

#VALUE! - occurs if num1 or num2 is a non-numeric value.

BITRSHIFT

The BITRSHIFT function retrieves a number shifted right by the specified number of bits.

Syntax

BITRSHIFT(num1,num2)

Where:

  • num1 must be an integer greater than or equal to 0.
  • Num2 must be an integer.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if num1 or num2 is less than zero, if num1 or num2 is a non-integer or is greater than (2^48)-1.

#VALUE! - occurs if num1 or num2 is a non-numeric value.

BITXOR

The BITXOR function retrieves a bitwise ‘XOR’ of two numbers.

Syntax

BITXOR(num1,num2b)

Where:

  • num1 and num2 should be in decimal format.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if num1 or num2 is less than zero, if num1 or num2 is a non-integer or is greater than (2^48)-1.

#VALUE! - occurs if num1 or num2 is a non-numeric value.

CEILING

Returns number rounded up, away from zero, to the nearest multiple of significance. For example, if you want to avoid using pennies in your prices and your product is priced at $4.82, use the formula =CEILING(4.82, 0.05) to round prices up to the nearest nickel.

Syntax

CEILING(number, significance)

Where:

  • number is the value you want to round off.
  • significance is the multiple to which you want to round.

CEILING.MATH

CEILING.MATH function rounds a number up to the nearest multiple of significance.

Syntax

CEILING(number, [significance], [mode])

Where:

  • number must be less than 9.99E+307 and greater than -2.229E-308.
  • significance must be the multiple to which the number is to be rounded.
  • mode is for negative numbers, it controls whether the number is rounded towards or away from zero.

CELL

The CELL function returns information about a given cell. This can be information in relation to the contents, formatting, or location of the cell.

Syntax

CELL( infoType, reference )

Where:

  • infoType argument is a text string that specifies the type of information to be returned.
  • reference is the cell for which the information is to be returned.

CHAR

The CHAR function returns the character whose number code is defined in the parameter.

Syntax

CHAR(number)

Where:

  • number is the numeric value to retrieve the character.

CHIDIST

Returns the one-tailed probability of the chi-squared distribution. The χ2 distribution is associated with a χ2 test.

Syntax

CHIDIST(x, degrees_freedom)

Where:

  • x is the value at which you want to evaluate the distribution.
  • degrees_freedom is the number of degrees of freedom.

CHIINV

Returns the inverse of the one-tailed probability of the chi-squared () distribution. If probability = CHIDIST(x,…), then CHIINV(probability,…) = x. Use this function to compare observed results with expected ones in order to decide whether your original hypothesis is valid.

Syntax

CHIINV(probability, degrees_freedom)

Where:

  • probability is a probability associated with the chi-squared distribution.
  • degrees_freedom is the number of degrees of freedom.

CHISQ.DIST

The CHISQ.DIST function calculates the Probability Density Function or the Cumulative Distribution Function for the chi-square distribution.

Syntax

CHISQ.DIST(x,degFreedom,cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value that evaluates the function.
  • degFreedom is the number of degrees of freedom.
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of the function.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any argument is non-numeric.

#NUM!- occurs if x is negative and if f degFreedom < 1 or degFreedom > 10^10.

CHISQ.DIST.RT

The CHISQ.DIST.RT function calculates the right-tailed probability of the chi-square distribution.

Syntax

CHISQ.DIST.RT(x,degFreedom)

Where:

  • x is the value that evaluates the function.
  • degFreedom is the number of degrees of freedom.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if either argument is non-numeric.

#VALUE! - occurs if any argument is non-numeric.
#NUM!- occurs occurs if f degFreedom < 1 or degFreedom > 10^10.

CHISQ.INV

The CHISQ.INV function returns the inverse of the left-tailed probability of the chi-squared distribution.

Syntax

CHISQ.INV(probability,degFreedom)

Where:

  • probability is a probability of chi-squared distribution.
  • deg_freedom is the number of degrees of freedom.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if probability is is less than zero, if probability is greater than 1 and degFreedom is less than 1.

#VALUE! - occurs if probability or degFreedom is non-numeric.

CHISQ.INV.RT

The CHISQ.INV.RT function calculates the inverse of the right-tailed probability of the chi-square distribution.

Syntax

CHISQ.INV.RT(probability, degFreedom)

Where:

  • probability is a probability of chi-squared distribution.
  • degFreedom is the number of degrees of freedom.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if probability is is less than zero, if probability is greater than 1 and if degFreedom is less than 1.
#VALUE! - occurs if probability or degFreedom is non-numeric.

CHISQ.TEST

The CHISQ.TEST function function performs the chi-square test on two supplied data sets (of observed and expected frequencies), and returns the probability that the differences between the sets are simply due to sampling error.

Syntax

CHISQ.TEST(O_range,E_range)

Where:

  • O_range is the range of data that contains observed values.
  • E_range is the range of data that contains expected values.

CHITEST

Returns the test for independence. CHITEST returns the value from chi-squared (c2) distribution for statistic and the appropriate degrees of freedom.

Syntax

CHITEST(actual_range, expected_range)

Where:

  • actual_range is the range of data that contains observations to test against expected values.
  • expected_range is the range of data that contains the ratio of the product of row totals and column totals to the grand total.

CHOOSE

The CHOOSE function returns the value from a range of values on a specific index.

Syntax:

CHOOSE(index, value array)

Where:

  • index is to specify the index from where you want to retrieve the value.
  • value array is the array of value from where you want to take the value.

CLEAN

CLEAN function is used to remove the non-printable characters from the given text, represented by numbers 0 to 31 of the 7-bit ASCII code.

Syntax

=Clean(Text)

Where:

Text: Required. String or text from which to remove non printable characters.

CODE

The CODE function converts the first character of a supplied text string into numeric character set code.

Syntax

CODE(name)

Where:

  • name is the text for which you want the code of the first character.

COLUMN

The Column function returns the column index of the provided column in range.

Syntax

Column(range)

Where:

  • range is to provide the column in range.

COLUMNS

The COLUMNS function returns the number of columns that are contained within the range.

Syntax

COLUMNS( array )

Where:

  • array argument is the range that you want to know the number of columns in.

COMPLEX

The COMPLEX function converts real and imaginary coefficients into a complex number of the form a + bi or a + bj.

Syntax

COMPLEX(number,imaginary_number, suffix )

Where:

  • number is the real coefficient of the complex number.
  • imaginary_number is the imaginary coefficient of the complex number.
  • suffix is the imaginary component of the complex number.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if number or imaginary_number is non-numeric, if suffix is neither “i” nor “j”.

COMBIN

Returns the number of combinations for a given number of items. Use COMBIN to determine the total possible number of groups for a given number of items.

Syntax

COMBIN(number, number_chosen)

Where:

  • number is the number of items.
  • number_chosen is the number of items in each combination.

COMBINA

For a given number of items, COMBINA function returns the number of combinations (with reputations).

Syntax

COMBINA(number1, number2)

Where:

  • number1 is greater than equal to zero and greater than equal to number2
  • number2 is greater than equal to zero.

CONCATENATE

Joins several text strings into one text string.

Syntax

CONCATENATE (text1, text2, …),

Where:

  • text1, text2, … are text items to be joined into a single text item. The text items can be text strings, numbers, or single-cell references.

CONFIDENCE

Returns a value that you can use to construct a confidence interval about population mean. The confidence interval is a range of values. In your sample, mean x is at the center of this range and the range is x ± CONFIDENCE. For example, if x is the sample mean of delivery times for products ordered through the mail, x ± CONFIDENCE is a range of population means.

Syntax

CONFIDENCE(alpha, standard_deviation, size)

Where:

  • alpha is the significance level used to compute the confidence level. The confidence level equals 100*(1 - alpha)%, or in other words, an alpha of 0.05 indicates a 95 percent confidence level.
  • standard_deviation is the population standard deviation for the data range and is assumed to be known.
  • size is the sample size.

CONFIDENCE.NORM

The CONFIDENCE.NORM function uses a Normal Distribution to calculate a confidence value that can be used to construct the confidence interval for a population mean, for a supplied probability and sample size.

Syntax

CONFIDENCE.NORM(alpha,standard_deviation,size)

Where:

  • alpha is the significance level.
  • standard_deviation is the population standard deviation for the data range.
  • size is the sample size.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any argument is non-numeric.

#NUM!- occurs if alpha and standard_deviation is less than or equal to zero or if alpha is greater than or equal to zero.

#DIV/0! - occurs if the size is equal to one.

CONFIDENCE.T

Using a student’s distribution, this function retrieves the confidence interval for a population mean.

Syntax

CONFIDENCE.T(alpha,standard_deviation,size)

Where:

  • alpha is the significance level used to compute the confidence level.
  • standard_deviation is the population standard deviation for data range and is assumed to be known.
  • size is the sample size.

CONVERT

The CONVERT function converts a number from one unit type (e.g. Yards) to another unit type (e.g. Meters).

Syntax

CONVERT(number,fromUnit,toUnit)

Where:

  • number is the value in fromUnit to convert.
  • fromUnit is the units for number.
  • toUnit is the units of the result.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if the input data types are incorrect.

#N/A - occurs if the unit does not exist or are in different groups.

CORREL

Returns the correlation coefficient of the array1 and array2 cell ranges.

Syntax

CORREL(array1, array2)

Where:

  • array1 is a cell range of values.
  • array2 is the second cell range of values.

COS

Returns the cosine of the given angle.

Syntax

COS(number)

Where:

  • number is the angle in radians for which you want the cosine.

COSH

Returns the hyperbolic cosine of a number.

Syntax

COSH(number)

Where:

  • number is any real number for which you want to find the hyperbolic cosine.

COT

COT function returns the cotangent of an angle specified in radians.

Syntax

COT(number)

Where:

  • number – the angle radians for which you want the secant.

COTH

COTH function returns the hyperbolic cotangent of a hyperbolic angle.

Syntax

COTH(number)

Where:

  • number – the angle radians for which you want the secant.

COUNT

Counts the number of items in a list that contains numbers.

Syntax

COUNT(value1,value2, …)

Where:

  • value1, value2, … are arguments that can contain or refer to a variety of different types of data, but only numbers are counted.

COUNTA

Counts the number of cells that are not empty.

Syntax

COUNTA(value1, value2, …)

Where:

  • value1, value2, … are arguments representing the values you want to count. In this case, a value is any type of information excluding empty cells.

COUNTBLANK

Counts empty cells in a specified range of cells.

Syntax

COUNTBLANK(range)

Where:

  • range is the range from which you want to count the blank cells.

COUNTIF

Counts the number of cells within a range that meet the given criteria.

Syntax

COUNTIF(range, criteria)

Where:

  • range is the range of cells from which you want to count cells.
  • criteria is the criteria in the form of a number, expression or text that defines which cells will be counted. For example, the criteria can be expressed as “>32”.

COUNTIFS

Counts the number of cells in specified ranges, which meet a set of given criteria.

Syntax

COUNTIFS(range1, criteria1, range2, criteria2)

Where

  • range1: Specifies a range of cells from which you want to count the cells.
  • criteria1: Specifies a criteria in the form of number, expression, or text that defines the cells that will be counted. For example, the criteria can be expressed as “>32”.
  • range2 and criteria2 are optional.

COVAR

Returns covariance, the average of the products of deviations for each data point pair.

Syntax

COVAR(array1, array2)

Where:

  • array1 is the first cell range of numbers.
  • array2 is the second cell range of numbers.

COVARIANCE.P

COVARIANCE.P function retrieves population covariance, the average of the products of deviations for each data point pair in two data sets.

Syntax

COVARIANCE.P(array1, array2)

Where:

  • array1 is the first cell range of integers.
  • array2 is the second cell range of integers.

COVARIANCE.S

COVARIANCE.S function returns the sample covariance, the average of the products of deviations for each data point pair in two data sets.

Syntax

COVARIANCE.S(array1, array2)

Where:

  • array1 is the first cell range of integers.
  • array2 is the second cell range of integers.

CRITBINOM

Returns the smallest value for which, the cumulative binomial distribution is greater than or equal to a criterion value.

Syntax

CRITBINOM(trials, probability_s, alpha)

Where:

  • trials is the number of Bernoulli trials.
  • probability_s is the probability of a success on each trial.
  • alpha is the criterion value.

CSC

CSC function returns the cosecant of an angle specified in radians.

Syntax

CSC(number)

Where:

  • number – the angle radians for which you want the secant.

CSCH

CSCH function returns the hyperbolic cosecant of an angle specified in radians.

Syntax

CSCH(number)

Where:

  • number – the angle radians for which you want the secant.

CUMIPMT

Returns the Macaulay duration for an assumed par value of $100. Duration is defined as the weighted average of the present value of cash flows and is used as a measure of a bond price’s response to changes in yield.

Syntax

DURATION(settlement, maturity, coupon, yield, frequency, basis)

Where:

  • Settlement - security’s settlement date.
  • Maturity - security’s maturity date.
  • Coupon – annual coupon rate
  • yield – security’s annual yield.
  • Frequency – number of coupon payments per year.
  • Basis – type of day count basis.

CUMPRINC

CUMPRINC function returns the cumulative principal paid on a loan between the start_period and end_period.

Syntax

CUMPRINC(rate, number_of_periods, present_value, start_period, end_period, type)

Where:

  • Rate – the interest rate.
  • number_of_periods - total number of payment periods
  • present_value - present value.
  • start_period- first period in calculation. Begin with one.
  • end_period- last period in calculation.
  • type - timing of the payment.

DATE

Returns the sequential serial number that represents a particular date.

Syntax

DATE(year, month, day)

Where:

  • year can be one to four digits. Year is interpreted based on 1900.
  • If a year is between 0 (zero) and 1899 (inclusive), the value is added to 1900 to calculate the year. For example, DATE(102,11,12) returns November 12, 2002 (1900+102).
  • If a year is between 1900 and 9999 (inclusive), the value is used as is, for example, DATE(2002,11,12) returns November 12, 2002.
  • month is a number representing the month of the year.
  • day is a number representing the day of the month.

DATEVALUE

Returns the serial number of the date represented by date_text.

Syntax

DATEVALUE(date_text),

Where:

  • date_text is the text that represents a date as a formatted string. For example, “11/12/2002” or “12-Nov-2002” are text strings within quotation marks that represent dates. If the year portion of the date_text is omitted, DATEVALUE uses current year from your computer’s built-in clock. The time information in the date_text is ignored.

Remarks

  • Dates are stored as sequential serial numbers so that they can be used in calculations. By default, January 1, 1900 is serial number 1, and November 12, 2002 is serial number 37572 because it is 37572 days after January 1, 1900.
  • Most functions automatically convert date values to serial numbers.

DAVERAGE

DAVERAGE function finds the average values in a column of a list or database that matches the conditions that have been specified.

Syntax

DAVERAGE(database, field, criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database
  • field indicates which column is used in the function
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DAY

Returns the day of a date represented by a serial number. The day is given as an integer ranging from 1 to 31.

Syntax

DAY(serial_number)

Where:

  • serial_number is the date of the day you are trying to find. Dates should be entered by using the DATE function or as results of other formulas or functions. For example, use DATE(2002,4,23) for the 23rd day of April, 2002.

DAYS

The DAYS function retrieves the number of days between two dates.

Syntax:

DAYS(endDate, startDate)

Where:

  • endDate and startDate are the two dates between which you want to know the number of days.

DAYS360

Returns the number of days between two dates based on a 360-day year (twelve 30-day months) which is used in some accounting calculations.

Syntax

DAYS360(start_date, end_date, method)

Where:

  • start_dateand end_dateare the two dates between which you want to know the number of days. If start_date occurs after end_date, DAYS360 returns a negative number. Dates should be entered by using the DATE function or as results of other formulas or functions.
  • method is a logical value that specifies whether to use the U.S. or European method in calculation. If method is: False or omitted – The calculation uses the U.S. (NASD) method. If the starting date is the 31st of a month, it becomes equal to the 30th of the same month. If the ending date is the 31st of a month and the starting date is earlier than the 30th of a month, the ending date becomes equal to the 1st of the next month; otherwise the ending date becomes equal to the 30th of the same month. True – The calculation uses the European method. Starting dates and ending dates that occur on the 31st of a month become equal to the 30th of the same month.

DB

Returns the depreciation of an asset for a specified period using the fixed-declining balance method.

Syntax

DB(cost, salvage, life, period, month)

Where:

  • cost is the initial cost of the asset.
  • salvage is the value at the end of the depreciation (sometimes called the salvage value of the asset).
  • life is the number of periods over which the asset is being depreciated (sometimes called the useful life of the asset).
  • period is the period for which you want to calculate the depreciation. Period must use the same units as life.
  • month is the number of months in the first year. If month is omitted, it is assumed to be 12.

DCOUNT

DCOUNT function counts the number of cells that contain numbers in a column of a list or database, which matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

DCOUNT(database, field, criteria )

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database
  • field indicates which column is used in the function
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DCOUNTA

DCOUNTA function counts the number of non-blank cells in a column of a list or database that matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

DCOUNTA(database, field, criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database.
  • field indicates which column is used in the function.
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DDB

Returns the depreciation of an asset for a specified period using double-declining balance method or some other method you specify.

Syntax

DDB(cost, salvage, life, period, factor)

Where:

  • cost is the initial cost of the asset.
  • salvage is the value at the end of depreciation (sometimes called the salvage value of the asset).
  • life is the number of periods over which the asset is being depreciated (sometimes called the useful life of the asset).
  • period is the period for which you want to calculate the depreciation. Period must use the same units as life.
  • factor is the rate at which the balance declines. If factor is omitted, it is assumed to be 2 (the double-declining balance method).
    NOTE All five arguments must be positive numbers.

DEC2BIN

The DEC2BIN function converts a decimal number into a binary number.

Syntax

DEC2BIN(number,places)

Where:

  • number is the decimal integer you want to convert.
  • places is the number of characters to use.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number < -512 or if number > 511 and if places is zero or negative.

#VALUE! - occurs if number or places is non-numeric, if DEC2BIN requires more than the number of characters specified in places.

DEC2OCT

The DEC2OCT function converts a decimal number into an octal number.

Syntax

DEC2OCT(number, places)

Where:

  • number is the decimal integer you want to convert.
  • places is the number of characters to use.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number < -512 or if number > 511 and if places is zero or negative.

#VALUE! - occurs if number or places is non-numeric, if DEC2OCT requires more than the number of characters specified in places.

DEC2HEX

The DEC2HEX function converts a decimal number into hexadecimal number.

Syntax

DEC2HEX(number, places )

Where:

  • number is the decimal integer you want to convert.
  • places is the number of characters to use.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number < -512 or if number > 511 and if places is zero or negative.

#VALUE! - occurs if number or places is non-numeric, if DEC2HEX requires more than the number of characters specified in places.

DECIMAL

A text representation of a number in a given base has been converted into a decimal number.

Syntax

DECIMAL(text, radix)

Where:

  • text is a string.
  • radix is an integer.

DEGREES

Converts radians into degrees.

Syntax

DEGREES(angle)

Where:

  • angle is the angle in radians that you want to convert.

DELTA

The DELTA function tests two numbers for equality and returns the Kronecker Delta. Returns 1 if a =b; returns 0 otherwise.

Syntax

DELTA(num1,num2)

Where:

  • num1 is the first number.
  • num2 is the second number.

DEVSQ

Returns the sum of squares of deviations of data points from their sample mean.

Syntax

DEVSQ(number1, number2, …)

Where:

number1, number2, … are arguments for which you want to calculate the sum of squared deviations. You can also use a single array or a reference to an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

DGET

DGET function extracts a single value from a column of a list or database that matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

DGET(database, field, criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database.
  • field indicates which column is used in the function.
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DISC

DISC function returns the discount rate for a security.

Syntax

Disc(Arg1, Arg2, Arg3, Arg4, Arg5)

Where:

  • Arg1 represents the security’s settlement date.
  • Arg2 represents the security’s maturity date.
  • Arg3 represents the security’ price per $100 face value.
  • Arg4 represents the security’s redemption value.
  • Arg5 represents the type of day count basis to use.

DIVREM

DIVREM function calculates the quotient of two numbers and also returns the remainder in an output parameter.

Syntax

Math.DivRem(a,b)

Where:

  • a and b are integers.

DMAX

DMAX function returns the largest number in a column of a list or database,which matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

DMAX(database,field,criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database.
  • field indicates which column is used in the function.
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DMIN

DMIN function returns the smallest number in a column of a list or database, which matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

DMIN(database,field,criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database.
  • field indicates which column is used in the function.
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DOLLAR

DOLLAR function converts a number to text, using currency format. The format used is $#,##0.00_);($#,##0.00).

Syntax

Dollar (number, decimal_places)

Where:

  • number is the number, which you want to convert to text.
  • decimal_places is the number of decimal digits to be displayed. The value will be rounded off accordingly.

DOLLARDE

A dollar price expressed as a fraction will be converted into a dollar price expressed as a decimal number.

Syntax

DOLLARDE(object arg1, object arg2)

Where:

  • Arg1 is a number expressed as a fraction.
  • Arg2 is an integer to use in the denominator of the fraction.

Remarks

#NUM!- Occurs if the fraction is less than 0. #DIV/0! - Occurs if the fraction is equal to 0.

DOLLARFR

Dollar price expressed as a decimal number will be converted into a dollar price expressed as a fraction.

Syntax

DOLLARFR (object arg1,object arg2)

Where:

  • arg1 is a decimal number.
  • arg2 is an integer to use in the denominator of a fraction.

DPRODUCT

The DPRODUCT function calculates the product of a field in a database for selected records which satisfy user mentioned criteria.

Syntax

DPRODUCT( database, field, criteria )

Where:

  • database presenting a range of the cells. The top row of the database should specify the field names.
  • field(column) within the database, that you want to calculate the product of. This can either be a field number, or can be the field name.
  • A range of cell containing criteria to specify which records should added in the calculation.

DSTDEV

DSTDEV function estimates the standard deviation of population based on a sample by using the numbers in a column of a list or database that matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

DSTDEV(database, field, criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database.
  • field indicates which column is used in the function.
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DSTDEVP

DSTDEVP function calculates the standard deviation of population based on the entire population using numbers in a column of a list or database that matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

DSTDEVP(database,field,criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database.
  • field indicates which column is used in the function.
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DSUM

DSUM function adds the numbers in a field (column) of records in a list or database that matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

DSUM(database, field, criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database.
  • field indicates which column is used in the function.
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DURATION

Returns the annual duration of a security with periodic interest payments.

Syntax

Duration (settlement, maturity, coupon, yield, frequency, basis)

Where:

  • Settlement – a security’s settlement date.
  • Maturity – a security’s maturity date.
  • Coupon – the annual coupon rate.
  • yield – security’s annual yield.
  • Frequency – the number of coupon payments per year.
  • Basis – the type of day count basis.

DVAR

DVAR function estimates the variance of population based on a sample by using the numbers in a column of a list or database which matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

VAR(database,field,criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database.
  • field indicates which column is used in the function.
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

DVARP

DVARP function calculates the variance of population based on the entire population by using numbers in a column of a list or database which matches the conditions specified.

Syntax

DVARP(database,field,criteria)

Where:

  • database is the range of cells that makes up the list or database.
  • field indicates which column is used in the function.
  • criteria is the range of cells that contains the conditions you specify.

EDATE

The EDATE function returns a date that is a specified number of months before or after a supplied start date.

Syntax

EDATE( startDate, Months )

Where:

  • startDate is the initial date, from which to count the number of months.
  • Months is the number of months to add to (or subtract from) the startDate.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if the supplied startDate is not a valid date.

#VALUE! - occurs if the supplied Months argument is non-numeric.

ENCODEURL

The ENCODEURL function retrieves a URL-encoded string.

Syntax

ENCODEURL(name)

Where:

  • name denotes a string that is to be URL encoded.

EOMONTH

The EOMONTH function returns the last day of the month that is a specified number of months before or after an initially supplied start date.

Syntax

EOMONTH(startDate, Months)

Where:

  • startDate is the initial date.
  • Months is the number of months to add to (or subtract from) the startDate before returning the last day of the resulting month

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if either any of the supplied arguments are not numeric values.

#NUM!- occurs if the supplied startDate is not a valid date.

#NUM!- occurs if the supplied startDate plus the value of the months argument is not a valid date.

ERF

The ERF function calculates the Error Function, integrated between two supplied limits.

Syntax

ERF(lowerLimit, upperLimit )

Where:

  • lowerLimit is lower bound for integrating ERF.
  • upperLimit is upper bound for integrating ERF.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if lowerLimit or upperLimit is non-numeric.

#NUM!- occurs if lowerLimit or upperLimit is negative.

ERF.PRECISE

The ERF.PRECISE function calculates the Error Function, integrated between a supplied lower or upper limit and 0.

Syntax

ERF.PRECISE(a)

Where:

  • a is the lower bound for integrating ERF.PRECISE.

Remarks

#VALUE! - a is non-numeric

ERROR.TYPE

The Error.Type function returns an integer for the given error value that denotes the type of given error.

Syntax

= ERROR.TYPE(value)
The given value is required.
Here is the return value of function:

GIVEN VALUE

RETURN VALUE OF FUNCTION

#NULL! 1
#DIV/0! 2
`#VALUE! 3
#REF! 4
#NAME? 5
#NUM! 6
#N/A 7
#GETTING_DATA 8
Anything else #N/A

Example:

FORMULA

RESULT

= ERROR.TYPE(#NULL!) 1
= ERROR.TYPE(even) #NA

EVEN

Returns the number rounded up to the nearest even integer.

Syntax

EVEN(number),

Where:

  • number is the value that is to be rounded.

EXACT

The EXACT function compares two values ignoring the styles and returns the boolean value as true or false.

Syntax

EXACT(value1, value2)

Where:

  • value1 is the first value you want to compare .
  • value2 is the second value you want to compare.

EXP

Returns e raised to the power of the given number.

Syntax

EXP(number),

Where:

  • number is the exponent applied to the base e.

EXPON.DIST

The EXPON.DIST function calculates the value of the probability density function or the cumulative distribution function for the exponential distribution.

Syntax

EXPON.DIST(x,y,cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value that evaluates the function.
  • y is the parameter value.
  • cumulative is a logical value for given function.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if x is less than zero and if y is equal to or less than zero.

#VALUE! - occurs if x or y is non-numeric.

EXPONDIST

Returns the exponential distribution.

Syntax

EXPONDIST(x, lambda, cumulative),

Where:

  • x is the value of the function.
  • lambda is the parameter value.
  • cumulative is a logical value that indicates which form of the exponential function is to be provided. If cumulative is True, EXPONDIST returns the cumulative distribution function; if False, it returns the probability density function.

F.DIST

The F.DIST function calculates the Probability Density Function or the Cumulative Distribution Function for the F Distribution.

Syntax

F.DIST(x,degFreedom1,degFreedom2,cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value that evaluates the function.
  • degFreedom1 is the numerator degrees of freedom.
  • degFreedom1 is the denominator degrees of freedom.
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of the function.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any argument is non-numeric.

#NUM!- occurs if x is negative, if degFreedom1< 1 and if degFreedom1< 1

F.DIST.RT

The F.DIST.RT function calculates the F Probability Distribution, which measures the degree of diversity between two data sets.

Syntax

F.DIST.RT(x, degFreedom1, degFreedom2)

Where:

  • x is the value that evaluates the function.
  • degFreedom1 is the numerator degrees of freedom.
  • DegFreedom2 is the denominator degrees of freedom.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any argument is non-numeric.
#NUM!- occurs if x is negative, if degFreedom1< 1 and if degFreedom2< 1

F.INV.RT

F.INV.RT function returns the inverse of F probability distribution.

Syntax

F.INV.RT(probability,deg_freedom1,deg_freedom2)

Where:

  • probability is a probability that corresponds to normal distribution.
  • deg_freedom1 is the numerator degrees of freedom.
  • deg_freedom2 is the denominator degrees of freedom.

FACT

Returns the factorial of a number. The factorial of a number is the product of all positive integers <= the given number.

Syntax

FACT(number),

Where:

  • number is the non-negative number for which you want the factorial. If the number is not an integer, it is truncated.

FACTDOUBLE

FACTDOUBLE function returns the double factorial of a given value. The given value must be an integer value.

Syntax

= FACTDOUBLE (number)

Where:

number – Required.

FALSE

FALSE function returns logical value when the given sting value is false.

Syntax

False(string value)

Where:

string value is to provide any text value or empty string.

FILTERXML

The FILTERXML function retrieves specific data from the XML content by using the specified XPath.

Syntax

FILTERXML(xml, XPath)

Where:

  • xml is a string in valid XML format.
  • XPath is a string in standard XPath format.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if XML is not valid or if XML contains a namespace with a prefix that is not valid.

FDIST

Returns the F probability distribution.

Syntax

FDIST(x, degrees_freedom1, degrees_freedom2),

Where:

  • x is the value at which to evaluate the function.
  • degrees_freedom1 is the numerator degrees of freedom.
  • degrees_freedom2 is the denominator degrees of freedom.

Find

The Find function finds a portion of a string from a particular text and returns the location of the string.

Syntax

Find(look for, look in, start)

Where:

  • look for is the text you want to search.
  • look in is the the text in which you want to search.
  • start specifies the starting position of the text from where you want to start searching in the text. This is optional.

FINDB

The FINDB function finds one text string (text1) within another text string (text2) and returns the number of the starting position of text1, based on the number of bytes each character uses, from the first character of text2.

Syntax

FINDB(text1,text2, number)

Where:

  • text1 is the text that to be found.
  • text2 is the text that contains found text..
  • number specifies the character at which to start the search.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if text1 does not appear in text2 and if number is not greater than zero.

FINV

FINV function returns the inverse of F probability distribution. If p = FDIST(x,…), then FINV(p,…) = x. By using F distribution, you can compare the degree of variability for two data sets.

Syntax

FINV(probability,deg_freedom1,deg_freedom2) FINV function syntax has the following three arguments (Argument is a value that provides information to an action, an event, a method, a property, a function, or a procedure):

Where:

  • Probability is a probability associated with F cumulative distribution.
  • Deg_freedom1 is the numerator degrees of freedom.
  • Deg_freedom2 is the denominator degrees of freedom.

FISHER

Returns Fisher transformation at x. This transformation produces a function that is normally distributed rather than skewed.

Syntax

FISHER(x),

Where:

  • x is a numeric value for which you want the transformation.

FISHERINV

Returns the inverse of Fisher transformation. If y = FISHER(x), then FISHERINV(y) = x.

Syntax

FISHERINV(y),

Where:

  • y is the value for which you want to perform the inverse of the transformation.

FIXED

FIXED function rounds off the given value to a specified number of decimal places and returns the value in text format.

Syntax

Fixed (number, decimal_places, no_commas)

Where:

  • number is the number, which you want to round off.
  • decimal_places is the number of decimal places you want to display in the result.
  • no_commas is a logical value. It will display commas when it is set to FALSE and does not display commas when it is set to TRUE.

FLOOR

Rounds off the given number down towards zero to the nearest multiple of significance.

Syntax

FLOOR(number, significance)

Where:

  • number is the numeric value that you want to round off.
  • significance is the multiple to which you want to round off the number.

FORECAST

Calculates future value with existing values by using linear regression. The predicted value is y-value for a given x-value.

Syntax

FORECAST(x, Known_YS, Known_XS)

Where:

  • x is the data point for which you want to predict a value.
  • Known_YS is the dependent array or range of data.
  • Known_XS is the independent array or range of data.

FORMULATEXT

FORMULATEXT function returns the formula as string.

Syntax

FORMULATEXT(reference)

Where:

  • reference is the reference to a cell or range of cells.

Remarks

#N/A - occurs if the reference argument is to another workbook that is not open.

#N/A - occurs if the reference argument is to a range containing more than one cell.

#N/A - occurs if the cell used as the reference argument does not contain a formula.

#N/A - occurs if the formula in the cell is longer than 8192 characters.

#N/A - occurs if the formula can’t be displayed in the worksheet.

#N/A - occurs if an external workbook that contains the formula which is not open.

FV

Returns the future value of an investment based on periodic, constant payments and interest rate.

Syntax

FV(rate, number_of_periods, payment, present_value, type)

Where:

  • rate is the interest rate per period.
  • number_of_periods is the total number of payment periods in an annuity.
  • payment is the payment made each period; it cannot change over the life of the annuity. Typically, payment contains principal and interest, but no other fees or taxes. If payment is omitted, you must include the present_value argument.
  • present_value is the present value or lump-sum amount that a series of future payments is worth right now. If present_value is omitted, it is assumed to be 0 (zero), and you must include the payment argument.
  • type is the number 0 or 1 and indicates when payments are due. If type is omitted it is assumed to be 0. If type equals: 0 - Payments are due at the end of the period. 1 - Payments are due at the beginning of the period. NOTE For a more complete description of the arguments in FV, see present_value.

FVSCHEDULE

After applying a series of compound interest rates, FVSchedule method returns future value of the initial principle.

Syntax

FVSchedule(arg1,arg2)

Where:

  • Arg1 is the present value.
  • Arg2 is an array of interest rates to apply.

Remarks

#VALUE! – occurs any other than numbers or blank cells.

GAMMA.DIST

The GAMMA.DIST function returns either the cumulative distribution or the probability density function for the Gamma Distribution.

Syntax

GAMMA.DIST(x,y,z,cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value that evaluates the function.
  • y is a distribution parameter.
  • z is a distribution parameter.
  • cumulative is a logical value that indicates which form of the exponential function to provide.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if x is less than zero, if z is equal to or less than zero and occurs if alpha is equal to or less than zero.

#VALUE! - occurs if x or y or z is non-numeric.

GAMMA.INV

The GAMMA.INV function returns the inverse of the Gamma Distribution.

Syntax

GAMMA.INV(x,y,z,cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value that evaluates the function.
  • y is a distribution parameter.
  • z is a distribution parameter.
  • cumulative is a logical value that indicates which form of the exponential function to provide.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if x is less than zero, if z is equal to or less than zero and occurs if alpha is equal to or less than zero.

#VALUE! - occurs if x or y or z is non-numeric

GAMMADIST

Returns the gamma distribution.

Syntax

GAMMADIST(x, alpha, beta, cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value at which you want to evaluate distribution.
  • alpha is a parameter to distribution.
  • beta is a parameter to distribution. If beta = 1, GAMMADIST returns the standard gamma distribution.
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of the function. If cumulative is True, GAMMADIST returns the cumulative distribution function; if False, it returns the probability density function.

GAMMAINV

Returns the inverse of the gamma cumulative distribution. If p = GAMMADIST(x,…), then GAMMAINV(p,…) = x.

Syntax

GAMMAINV(probability, alpha, beta)

Where:

  • probability is the probability associated with the gamma distribution.
  • alpha is a parameter to the distribution.
  • beta is a parameter to the distribution.

GAMMALN

Returns the natural logarithm of the gamma function, Ã(x).

Syntax

GAMMALN(x),

Where:

  • x is the value for which you want to calculate GAMMALN.

GAMMALN.PRECISE

The GAMMALN.PRECISE function returns the natural logarithm of the Gamma Distribution.

Syntax

GAMMALN.PRECISE( x )

Where:

  • x is the positive numeric value that evaluates the function.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if x is less than zero.

#VALUE! - occurs if x is non-numeric.

GCD

The GCD function returns the greatest common divisor of two or more given values. The values must be a numeric value.

Syntax

GCD (number1, number2, …) Number1 – Required. If any value is not an integer, then it will be rounded down.

GEOMEAN

Returns the geometric mean of an array or range of positive data.

Syntax

GEOMEAN(number1, number2, …)

Where:

number1, number2, … are arguments for which you want to calculate the mean.

GESTEP

The GESTEP function tests whether a supplied number is greater than a supplied step size and returns 1 if number ≥ step; returns 0 (zero) otherwise.

Syntax

GESTEP(number, step )

Where:

  • number is the value to test against step.
  • step is the threshold value.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any argument is non-numeric.

GROWTH

GROWTH enables you to calculate predicted exponential growth by using existing data. This calculates and returns an array of values used for regression analysis.

Syntax

=GROWTH(known_y’s, [known_x’s], [new_x’s]

Where:

  • known_y’s: A set of y-values you already know in a relationship, where y = b*m^x.
  • known_x’s: An optional set of x-values that you may already know in the relationship, where y = b*m^x.
  • new_x’s: New x-values for which you want GROWTH to return corresponding y-values. Code =Growth(B2:B7,A2:A7,C6:C7)

HARMEAN

Returns the harmonic mean of a data set. The harmonic mean is the reciprocal of arithmetic mean of reciprocals.

Syntax

HARMEAN(number1, number2, …)

Where:

number1, number2, … are arguments for which you want to calculate the mean.

HEX2BIN

The HEX2BIN function converts a hexadecimal number into a binary number.

Syntax

HEX2BIN(number, places )

Where:

  • number is the decimal integer you want to convert.
  • places is the number of characters to use.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number is not a valid binary number, if if places is negative.

#VALUE! - occurs if places is non-numeric.

HEX2OCT

The HEX2OCT function converts a hexadecimal number into an octal number.

Syntax

HEX2OCT(number, places)

Where:

  • number is the hexadecimal integer you want to convert.
  • places is the number of characters to use.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number is not a valid hexadecimal number and if if places is negative.

#VALUE! - occurs if places is non-numeric.

HEX2DEC

The HEX2DEC function converts a hexadecimal number into a decimal number.

Syntax

HEX2DEC(number)

Where:

  • number is the hexadecimal integer you want to convert.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number is not a valid hexadecimal number.

HLOOKUP

Searches for a value in the top row of the array of values and then returns a value in the same column from a row you specify in the array. Use HLOOKUP when your comparison values are located in a row across the top of a table of data and you want to look down a specified number of rows. Use VLOOKUP when your comparison values are located in a column to the left of the data you want to find.

Syntax

HLOOKUP(lookup_value, table_array, row_index_number, range_lookup)

Where:

  • lookup_value is the value to be found in the first row of the table. Lookup_value can be a value, a reference or a text string.
  • table_array is a table of information in which, data is looked up. Use a reference to a range or a range name.
  • row_index_number is the row number in table_array from which, the matching value will be returned. A row_index_number of 1 returns the first row value in table_array, a row_index_number of 2 returns the second row value in table_array and so on.
  • range_lookup is a logical value that specifies whether you want HLOOKUP to find an exact match or an approximate match. If True or omitted, an approximate match is returned. In other words, if an exact match is not found, the next largest value that is less than the lookup_value is returned. (This requires your lookup values to be sorted.) If False, HLOOKUP will find an exact match.

The HYPERLINK function creates a hyperlink to a document in a supplied location.

Syntax

HYPERLINK( linkLocation, friendlyName )

Where

  • linkLocation is the address of the file to link to.
  • friendlyName is the text to display in the cell.

HOUR

Returns the hour of a time value. The hour is given as an integer, ranging from 0 (12:00 A.M.) to 23 (11:00 P.M.).

Syntax

HOUR(serial_number),

Where:

  • serial_number is the time that contains the hour you want to find. Times may be entered as text strings within quotation marks (for example, “6:00 PM”), as decimal numbers (for example, 0.75, which represents 6:00 PM), or as results of other formulas or functions (for example, TIMEVALUE(“6:00 PM”)).

HYPGEOMDIST

Returns the hypergeometric distribution. HYPGEOMDIST returns the probability of a given number of sample successes, given the sample size, population successes and population size.

Syntax

HYPGEOMDIST(sample_s, number_sample, population_s, number_population),

Where:

  • sample_s is the number of successes in the sample.
  • number_sample is the size of the sample.
  • population_s is the number of successes in the population.
  • number_population is the population size.

IEEEREMAINDER

IEEEREMAINDER function returns the remainder operation on two arguments.

Syntax

IEEERemainder(d1, d2)

Where:

  • d1 is the divisor.
  • d2 is the dividend.

IF

Returns one value if a condition you specify evaluates to True and another value if it evaluates to False. Use IF to conduct conditional tests on values and formulas.

Syntax

IF(logical_test, value_if_true, value_if_false)

Where:

  • logical_test is any value or expression that can be evaluated to True or False.
  • value_if_true is the value that is returned if a logical_test is True.
  • value_if_false is the value that is returned if a logical_test is False.

IFERROR

IFERROR function tests if an initial given value (or expression) returns an error, and if so, this function returns a second given argument. Otherwise, the function returns the initial tested value.

Syntax

= IFERROR (value, value_error)

Where:

value –This is a value to check the error. value_error –This value will be returned if the value has an error.

IFNA

IFNA function returns the value specified if the formula returns #N/A error value; otherwise, it returns the result of the given formula.

Syntax

=IFNA (Formula_value, value_if_NA)

Where:

  • Formula_value- The argument that is checked for the #N/A error value.
  • value_if_NA-The value returned if the formula evaluates to the #N/A error value.

IMABS

The IMABS function calculates the absolute value of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMABS(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the absolute value.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is not in the form a + bi or a + bj.

IMAGINARY

The IMAGINARY function returns the imaginary coefficient of a complex number in a + bi or a+bj text format.

Syntax

IMAGINARY(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the absolute value.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is not in the form a + bi or a + bj.

IMREAL

The IMREAL function returns the real coefficient of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMREAL(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the absolute value.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is not in the form a + bi or a + bj.

COMPLEX

The COMPLEX function converts real and imaginary coefficients into a complex number of the form a + bi or a + bj.

Syntax

COMPLEX(number,imaginary_number, suffix )

Where:

  • number is the real coefficient of the complex number.
  • imaginary_number is the imaginary coefficient of the complex number.
  • suffix is the imaginary component of the complex number.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if number or imaginary_number is non-numeric, if suffix is neither “i” nor “j”.

IMSUM

The IMSUM function calculates the sum of two or more complex numbers in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMSUM(imaginary_number1,imaginary_number2,…) where:

  • imaginary_number1,imaginary_number2,… are 1 to 29 complex numbers to add.

IMSUB

The IMSUB function calculates the difference of two complex numbers in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMSUB(imaginary_number1,imaginary_number2)

Where:

  • imaginary_number1 is the complex number from which to subtract imaginary_number1.

IMPRODUCT

The IMPRODUCT function calculates the product of 1 to 255 complex numbers in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMPRODUCT(imaginary_number1, imaginary_number2,… )

Where:

  • imaginary_number1, imaginary_number2,… are 1 to 255 complex numbers to multiply.
  • imaginary_number2 is the complex number to subtract from imaginary_number1.

IMDIV

The IMDIV function calculates the quotient of two complex numbers in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMDIV(imaginary_number1, imaginary_number2) where:

  • imaginary_number1 is the complex numerator or dividend.
  • imaginary_number2 is the complex denominator or divisor.

IMCONJUGATE

The IMCONJUGATE function calculates the complex conjugate of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMCONJUGATE(imaginary_number) where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the conjugate.

IMSQRT

The IMSQRT function calculates the square root of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMSQRT(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the square root.

IMARGUMENT

The IMARGUMENT function retrieves the argument Theta, an angle expressed in radians.

Syntax

IMARGUMENT(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the argument Theta.

IMSIN

The IMSIN function returns the sine of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMSIN(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the sine.

IMCSC

The IMCSC function retrieves the cosecant of a complex number in a+bi or a+bj text format.

Syntax

IMCSC(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the cosecant.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in the a+bi or a+bj text format.

#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMCOS

The IMCOS function retrieves the cosine of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMCOS(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the cosine.

IMSEC

The IMSEC function retrieves the secant of a complex number in a+bi or a+bj text format.

Syntax

IMSEC(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the secant.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in the a + bi or a + bj text format.

#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMTAN

The IMTAN function retrieves the tangent of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMTAN(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the cotangent.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in a + bi or a + bj text format.

#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMCOT

The IMCOT function calculates the cotangent of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMCOT(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the cotangent.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in a + bi or a + bj text format.

#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMSINH

The IMSINH function calculates the hyperbolic sine of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMSINH(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the hyperbolic sine.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in a + bi or a + bj text format.

#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMCSCH

The IMCSCH function calculates the hyperbolic cosecant of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMCSCH(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the hyperbolic cosecant.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in a + bi or a + bj text format.

#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMCOSH

The IMCOSH function calculates the hyperbolic cosine of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMCOSH(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the hyperbolic cosine.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in a + bi or a + bj text format.

#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMSECH

The IMSECH function calculates the hyperbolic secant of a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format.

Syntax

IMSECH(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the hyperbolic secant.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in a + bi or a + bj text format.
#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMTANH

The IMTANH function calculates the hyperbolic tangent of the complex number z.

Syntax

IMTANH(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the hyperbolic tangent.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in a + bi or a + bj text format.

#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMCOTH

The IMCOTH function calculates the hyperbolic cotangent of the complex number z.

Syntax

IMCOTH(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the hyperbolic cotangent.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is a value that is not in the a + bi or a + bj text format.

#VALUE! - occurs if imaginary_number is a logical value.

IMLOG10

The IMLOG10 function calculates the common logarithm (base 10) of a complex number z.

Syntax

IMLOG10(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the common logarithm.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is not in the complex format

IMLOG2

The IMLOG2 function calculates the base-2 logarithm of a complex number z.

Syntax

IMLOG2(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the base-2 logarithm.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is not in the complex format.

IMLN

The IMLN function calculates the natural logarithm of a complex number z.

Syntax

IMLN(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the natural logarithm.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is not in the complex format

IMEXP

The IMEXP function calculates the exponential of a complex number z.

Syntax

IMEXP(imaginary_number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number for which you want the exponential.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is not in the complex format

IMPOWER

The IMPOWER function calculates a complex number in a + bi or a + bj text format raised to a power.

Syntax

IMPOWER(imaginary_number,number)

Where:

  • imaginary_number is a complex number you want to raise to a power.
  • number is the power to which you want to raise the complex number.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if imaginary_number is not in the complex format

#VALUE! - occurs if number is non-numeric.

INDEX

The INDEX function returns the exact cell value from the provided row index and column index from a specific range of cells.

Syntax

Index(range,row,col)

Where:

  • range is a string to mention the specific range.
  • row is the integer that indicates the specific row index.
  • col is the integer that indicates the specific column index.

INDIRECT

The INDIRECT function returns the reference as a string instead of providing the content or range within the cell.

Syntax

Indirect(content),

Where:

content is the string that provides the textual representation of the cell reference.

INFO

The INFO function returns a text string containing information about the current operating environment.

Syntax

INFO( infoType )

Where:

  • infoType argument is a text string that specifies the type of information to be returned.

INT

Rounds a number down to the nearest integer.

Syntax

INT(number),

Where:

number is the real number that you want to round down to an integer.

INTRATE

INTRATE function returns the interest rate for a fully invested security.

Syntax

INTRATE(settlement, maturity, investment, redemption, basis )

Where:

  • settlement is the security’s settlement date.
  • maturity is the security’s maturity date.
  • investment is the amount invested in the security.
  • redemption is the amount to be received at maturity.
  • basis is the kind of day count basis to use.

INTERCEPT

Calculates the point at which the least squares fit line will intersect the y-axis.

Syntax

INTERCEPT(known_y’s, known_x’s)

Where:

  • known_y’s is the dependent set of observations or data.
  • known_x’s is the independent set of observations or data.

IPMT

Returns the interest payment for a given period of investment based on periodic, constant payments and constant interest rate.

Syntax

IPMT(rate, per, number_of_periods, present_value, future_value, type)

Where:

  • rate is the interest rate per period.
  • per is the period for which you want to find the interest and must be in the range 1 to number_of_periods.
  • number_of_periods is the total number of payment periods in an annuity.
  • present_value is the present value or the lump-sum amount that a series of future payments is worth right now.
  • future_value is the future value or a cash balance that you want to attain after the last payment is made. If future_value is omitted, it is assumed to be 0 (the future value of a loan, for example, is 0).
  • type is the number 0 or 1 and indicates when payments are due. If type is omitted, it is assumed to be 0. If type = 0, payments are made at the end of the period. If type is 1, payments are made at the beginning of the period.

IRR

Returns the internal rate of return for a series of cash flows represented by the numbers in values. The cash flows must occur at regular intervals such as monthly or annually.

Syntax

IRR(values, guess)

Where:

  • values is an array or a reference to cells that contain numbers for which you want to calculate the internal rate of return. Values must contain at least one positive value and one negative value to calculate the internal rate of return.& IRR uses the order of values to interpret the order of cash flows. Be sure to enter your payment and income values in the sequence you want.
  • Guess is a number that you guess close to the result of IRR. An iterative technique is used for calculating IRR. In most cases, you do not need to provide a guess for the IRR calculation. If a guess is omitted, it is assumed to be 0.1 (10 percent).

ISERR

The ISERR function checks whether a value is an error.

Syntax

IsErr(value)

Where:

value is the value that you want to test for error. If the value has an error (except #N/A), this function will return TRUE or else it will return FALSE.

ISERROR

Returns True if the value is a string that starts with a #.

Syntax

ISERROR(value),

Where:

value is the value that is to be tested.

ISEVEN

The ISEVEN function returns TRUE if given number is an even number and returns FALSE if the given number is an odd number.

Syntax

ISEVEN (value),

Where:

value must be a numeric value. If it is non-integer value, the value is rounded down.

ISFORMULA

The ISFORMULA function returns true or false if there is a reference to a cell that contains a formula.

Syntax

ISFORMULA(reference)

Where:

  • Reference is a reference to the cell you want to test.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if reference is not a valid data type.

ISNA

The ISNA function returns a boolean value after determining that the provided value is a #NA error value.

Syntax

IsNA(value)

Where:

value is the value, which the function will test.

ISNUMBER

Returns True if the value parses as a numeric value.

Syntax

ISNUMBER(value),

Where:

value is the value that is to be tested.

ISOWEEKNUM

For a given date, the ISOWEEKNUM function returns the ISO week number of that year.

Syntax

ISOWEEKNUM( DateTime)

Where:

  • DateTime is used for date and time calculation.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if the date argument is not a valid number.
#VALUE! - occurs if the date argument is not a valid date type.

ISPMT

Calculates the interest paid during a specific period of investment.

Syntax

ISPMT(rate, per, number_of_periods, present_value),

Where:

  • rate is the interest rate for the investment.
  • per is the period for which you want to find the interest, and it must be between 1 and number_of_periods.
  • number_of_periods is the total number of payment periods for the investment.
  • present_value is the present value of the investment. For a loan, present_value is the loan amount.

ISREF

The ISREF function returns the logical value TRUE if the given value is a reference value; otherwise, the function returns FALSE.

Syntax

=ISREF(given_value)

Where:

given_value- The value that is to be tested. The value argument can be a blank (empty cell), error, logical value, text, number, or reference value, or a name referring to any of these.

ISTEXT

The ISTEXT function returns a boolean value after determining that the provided value is a string.

Syntax

IsText(text)

Where:

text is the value you want to check whether it is a string or not.

ISNONTEXT

The ISNONTEXT function returns the boolean value after determining that the provided value is not a string.

Syntax

IsNonText(text)

Where:

text is the value you want to check whether it is a string or not.

JIS

The JIS function changes single-byte English letters or katakana within a character string to double-byte characters. This function is a Japanese-specific feature.

Syntax

JIS(name)

Where:

  • name is a reference to a cell that contains the text.

KURT

Returns the kurtosis of data set. Kurtosis characterizes the relative flatness of a distribution compared to the normal distribution. Positive kurtosis indicates a relatively peaked distribution. Negative kurtosis indicates a relatively flat distribution.

Syntax

KURT(number1, number2, …),

Where:

number1, number2, … are arguments for which you want to calculate kurtosis. You can also use a single array or a reference to an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

LARGE

Returns the k-th largest value in a data set.

Syntax

LARGE(array, k),

Where:

  • array is the array or range of data for which you want to determine the k-th largest value.
  • k is the position (from the largest) in the array or cell range of data to return.

LCM

LCM function returns the least common multiple of two or more given values. The values must be numeric values.

Syntax

= LCM (number1, number2, …)

Where:

number1, number2 – are arguments for which you want to calculate the least common multiple . You can also use an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

LEFT

LEFT returns the first character or characters in a text string based on the number of characters you specify.

Syntax

LEFT(text, numeric_chars)

Where:

  • text is the text string that contains characters you want to extract.
  • numeric_charsspecifies the number of characters you want LEFT to extract.

LEFTB

The LEFTB function returns the first character or characters in a text string, based on the number of bytes you specify for double-byte character set (DBCS) languages.

Syntax

LEFTB(text, bytes)

Where:

  • text is a string that contains the characters that you want to return.
  • bytes specifies the number of characters.

LEN

LEN returns the length of a text string including spaces.

Syntax

Len(text),

Where:

text is the text string whose length is to be determined.

LENB

The LENB function returns the number of bytes used to represent the characters in a text string for DBCS languages.

Syntax

LENB(name)

Where:

  • name is the text whose length you want to find.

LN

Returns the natural logarithm of a number. Natural logarithms are based on the constant e (2.718281828459…).

Syntax

LN(number)

Where:

  • number is the positive real number for which you want the natural logarithm.

LOG

Returns the logarithm of a number to the base that you specify.

Syntax

LOG(number, base)

Where:

  • number is the positive real number for which you want the logarithm.
  • base is the base of the logarithm. If base is omitted, it is assumed to be 10.

LOG10

Returns the base-10 logarithm of a number.

Syntax

LOG10(number),

Where:

  • number is the positive real number for which you want the base-10 logarithm.

ISBLANK

The ISBLANK function checks for blank or null values.

Syntax

IsBlank(value)

Where:

  • value is the value that you want to test. If the value is blank, this function will return TRUE. If the value is not blank, this function will return FALSE.

ISODD

The ISODD function returns TRUE if the given number is an odd number and returns FALSE if the given number is even.

Syntax

ISODD (value),

Where:

  • value must be a numeric value. If it is a non-integer, the value is rounded down.

LOGEST

This feature enables you to calculate predicted exponential growth using existing data. This calculates and returns an array of values used for regression analysis.

Syntax

=LOGEST(known_y’s, [known_x’s], [constant], [statistics])

Where:

  • known_y’s: A set of y-values you already know in a relationship, where y = b*m^x.
  • known_x’s: An optional set of x-values that you may already know in a relationship, where y = b*m^x.
  • constant : A logical value specifying whether to force the constant b to equal 1.
  • statistics : A logical value specifying whether to return additional regression statistics.
    Code
    = Logest(B2:B7, A2:A7, TRUE, FALSE)

ISLOGICAL

The ISLOGICAL function checks whether a value is a logical value and returns TRUE or FALSE.

Syntax

IsLogical(value)

Where:

  • value is the value to check if it is logical. If the value is TRUE or FALSE, this function will return TRUE. Otherwise, it will return FALSE.

LOGINV

Returns the inverse of the lognormal cumulative distribution function of x, where ln(x) is normally distributed with parameters mean and standard_deviation. If p = LOGNORMDIST(x,…), then LOGINV(p,…) = x.

Syntax

LOGINV(probability, mean, standard_deviation),

Where:

  • probability is the probability associated with the lognormal distribution.
  • mean is the mean of ln(x).
  • standard_deviation is the standard deviation of ln(x).

LOGNORM.DIST

The LOGNORM.DIST function calculates the Log-Normal Probability Density Function or the Cumulative Log-Normal Distribution Function for a supplied value of x.

Syntax

LOGNORM.DIST(x,mean,standard_deviation,cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value that evaluates the function.
  • mean is the mean value of ln(x).
  • standard_deviation is the standard deviation of ln(x).
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of the function.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any argument is non-numeric.

#NUM!- occurs if x ≤ 0 or if standard_deviation ≤ 0.

LOGNORM.INV

The LOGNORM.INV function calculates the inverse of the Cumulative Log-Normal Distribution Function of x, for a supplied probability.

Syntax

LOGNORM.INV(probability, mean, standard_deviation)

Where:

  • probability is a probability that corresponds to the lognormal distribution.
  • mean is the arithmetic mean of In(x).
  • standard_deviation is the standard deviation of ln(x).

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any argument is non-numeric.

#NUM!- occurs if probability <= 0 or probability >= 1 and if standard_deviation<=0.

LOGNORMDIST

Returns the cumulative lognormal distribution of x, where ln(x) is normally distributed with parameters mean and standard_deviation.

Syntax

LOGNORMDIST(x, mean, standard_deviation),

Where:

  • x is the value at which the function can be evaluated.
  • mean is the mean of ln(x).
  • standard_deviation is the standard deviation of ln(x).

LOOKUP

LOOKUP function returns a value either from a one-row or one-column range or from an array. LOOKUP function has two syntax forms: vector and array.
Vector Form The vector form of LOOKUP looks in one-row or one-column range for a value and then returns the value from the same position in the second one-row or one-column range.

Syntax

LOOKUP(lookup_value, lookup_vector, result_vector)
Array form The array form of LOOKUP looks in the first row or column of an array for the specified value, and then returns a value from the same position in the last row or column of the array.

Syntax

=LOOKUP(lookup_value, array)

LOWER

LOWER function converts all characters in a specified text string to lowercase. Characters in the string that are not text are not changed.

Syntax

Lower(text)

Where:

text is the string you want to convert to lowercase.

MATCH

The Match function searches for a specified value in an array and returns the relative position of that item.

Syntax

Match( value, array, match_type )

Where:

  • value is the value you want to search in the array.
  • array is a range of cells that contains the value you want to search.
  • match_type is the type of match you want to perform.
    match_type accepts the following values:
    • 1 - The Match function will find the largest value that is less than or equal to the specified value. Ensure that the array is sorted in ascending order.
    • 0 - The Match function will find the first value that is equal to the specified value. The array can be sorted in any order.
      • 1 - The Match function will find the smallest value that is greater than or equal to the specified value. Ensure that the array is sorted in descending order.

NOTE

  1. The Match function does not distinguish between uppercase and lowercase when searching.
    2.If the Match function does not find a match, it returns #N/A error.
    3.match_type is optional. The Match Function assumes match_type as 1 when the parameter is omitted.
    4.If the match_type parameter is 0 and a text value, then you can use wildcards in the value parameter.
    where,
      • matches any sequence of characters
        ? - matches any single character

MAX

Returns the largest value in a set of values.

Syntax

MAX(number1, number2, …),

Where:

number1, number2, … are numbers for which you want to find the maximum value.

MAXA

Returns the largest value in a list of arguments. Text and logical values such as True and False are compared as well as numbers.

Syntax

MAXA(value1, value2, …),

Where:

value1, value2, … are values for which you want to find the largest value.

MDETERM

MDETERM function retrieves the matrix determinant of an array.

Syntax

MDETERM(array)

Where:

array is a numeric array with an equal number of rows and columns.

MEDIAN

Returns the median of the given numbers. Median is the number in the middle of a set of numbers; that is, half the numbers have values that are greater than the median and half have values that are less.

Syntax

MEDIAN(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are numbers for which you want the median.

Remarks

  • If there is an even number of numbers in the set, then MEDIAN calculates the average of the two numbers in the middle.

MID

MID returns a text segment of a character string. The parameters specify the starting position and the number of characters.

Syntax

MID(text, start_position, numeric_chars),

Where:

  • text is the text containing characters to extract.
  • start is the position of the first character in the text to extract.
  • number specifies the number of characters in the part of text.

MIDB

The MIDB function returns a specific number of characters from a text string, starting at the position you specify, based on the number of bytes you specify for double-byte character set (DBCS) languages.

Syntax

MIDB(text, startNumber, numericBytes)

Where:

  • text is a string that contains the characters that you want to return.
  • startNumber is the position of the first character that you want to extract in text.
  • numericBytes specifies the number of characters you want in bytes.

MIN

Returns the smallest number in a set of values.

Syntax

MIN(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are numbers for which you want to find the minimum value.

MINA

Returns the smallest value in the list of arguments. Text and logical values such as True and False are compared as well as numbers.

Syntax

MINA(value1,value2, …),

Where:

  • value1, value2, … are values for which you want to find the smallest value.

Remarks

  • Arguments that contain True evaluate as 1; arguments that contain text or False evaluate as 0 (zero).

MINUTE

Returns the minutes of time value. The minute is given as an integer, ranging from 0 to 59.

Syntax

MINUTE(serial_number),

Where:

  • serial_number is the time that contains the minute you want to find. Times may be entered as text strings within quotation marks (for example, “6:00 PM”), as decimal numbers (for example, 0.75, which represent 6:00 PM), or as results of other formulas or functions (for example, TIMEVALUE(“6:00 PM”)).

MINVERSE

MINVERSE function retrieves inverse matrix for the matrix stored in an array.

Syntax

MINVERSE(array)

Where:

array is a numeric array with an equal number of rows and columns.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any cell in the array is empty or contains a string.

#VALUE! - occurs if the array does not have an equal number of rows and columns.

MIRR

Returns the modified internal rate of return for a series of periodic cash flow.

Syntax

MIRR(values, finance_rate, reinvest_rate),

Where:

  • values is an array or reference to cells that contain numbers. These numbers represent a series of payments (negative values) and income (positive values) occurring at regular periods. Values must contain at least one positive value and one negative value to calculate the modified internal rate of return.
  • finance_rate is the interest rate you pay on the money used in the cash flows.
  • reinvest_rate is the interest rate you receive on the cash flows as you reinvest them.

MMULT

MMULT function returns the matrix product of two arrays. Both the arrays should have same number of columns and same number of rows.

Syntax

MMULT(a1,a2)

Where:

a1,a2 are the arrays that have to be multiplied.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any cell in array is empty or contains string.

#VALUE! - occurs if the array does not have an equal number of rows and columns.

MOD

Returns the remainder after the number is divided by a divisor. The result has the same sign as the divisor.

Syntax

MOD(number, divisor),

Where:

  • number is the number for which you want to find the remainder.
  • divisor is the value by which you want to divide the number.

MODE

Returns the most frequently occurring or repetitive value in an array or range of data.

Syntax

MODE(number1, number2, …),

Where:

number1, number2, … are arguments for which you want to calculate the mode.

Remarks

In a set of values, mode is the most frequently occurring value.

MODE.MULT

The MODE.MULT function returns a vertical array of the statistical modes (the most frequently occurring values) within a list of supplied numbers.

Syntax

MODE.MULT(number1)

Where:

  • number1 is the first number argument for which you want to calculate the mode.

Remarks

#N/A - occurs if the data set contains no duplicate data points.

MODE.SNGL

The MODE.SNGL function returns the most repetitive values in range of data.

Syntax

MODE.SNGL(number1,[number2],…)

Where:

  • number1 and number2 arguments for which you want to calculate the mode.

MONTH

Returns the month of a date represented by a serial number. Month is given as an integer, ranging from 1 (January) to 12 (December).

Syntax

MONTH(serial_number),

Where:

  • serial_number is the date of the month you are trying to find. Dates should be entered by using the DATE function or as results of other formulas or functions. For example, use DATE(2002,11,12) for the 12th day of Nov, 2002.

Remarks

  • Dates are stored as sequential serial numbers so that they can be used in calculations. By default, January 1, 1900 is serial number 1 and January 1, 2008 is serial number 39448 because it is 39,448 days after January 1, 1900.

MROUND

MROUND function rounds a given number up or down to the nearest multiple of a given number.

Syntax

MROUND (number, multiple)

Where:

  • number – The value to be rounded. This value is required.
  • multiple – This value is required.

Remarks

The number must be greater than or equal to half the value of multiple.

#NUM!- Occurs if the number and multiple have different signs.

#VALUE! - Occurs if any of the given argument is non-numeric.

MULTINOMIAL

MULTINOMIAL function returns the ratio of the factorial of a sum of values to the product of factorials.

Syntax

MULTINOMIAL(number1, (number2), …)

Where:

number1, number2, … - are arguments for which you want the multinomial.

MUNIT

MUNIT function retrieves the unit matrix for the particular dimension that has been specified.

Syntax

MUNIT(dimension)

Where:

dimension is an integer specifying the dimension of the unit matrix that you want to return.

N

The N function converts the given value into a numeric value.

Syntax

N (value),

Where:

value is required. Numeric values are converted to numeric values. A date value is converted to serial number. Logic operator TRUE returns a value of 1. The other values return as 0.

NA

The NA function returns the #N/A error. This error message is produced when a formula is unable to find a value that it needs. This error message denotes value not available.

Syntax

NA()

Remarks

The function does not have any arguments.

NEGBINOM.DIST

The NEGBINOM.DIST function calculates the probability mass function or the cumulative distribution function for the Negative Binomial Distribution.

Syntax

NEGBINOM.DIST(F_number,S_number,S_probability,cumulative)

Where:

  • F_number is the number of failures.
  • S_number is the threshold number of successes.
  • S_probabilitys is the probability of a success.
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of the function.

NEGBINOMDIST

Returns the negative binomial distribution. NEGBINOMDIST returns the probability that there will be number_f failures before the number_s-th success, when the constant probability of a success is probability_s.

Syntax

NEGBINOMDIST(number_f, number_s, probability_s),

Where:

  • number_f is the number of failures.
  • number_s is the threshold number of successes.
  • probability_s is the probability of a success.

NETWORKDAYS

NETWORKDAYS function is used to calculate the number of whole work days between two given dates. This includes all weekdays from Monday to Friday, but excludes a supplied list of holidays.

Syntax

NETWORKDAYS( start_date, end_date, [holidays] )

Where:

  • start_date: The start of the period to find the working days
  • end_date:The end of the period to find the working days.
  • holidays:An optional argument, which specifies an array of dates that are not to be counted as working days. Notes If any argument is not a valid date, NETWORKDAYS returns the #VALUE! error value.

NETWORKDAYS.INTL

NETWORKDAYS.INTL calculates the number of whole work days between two supplied dates.

Syntax

NETWORKDAYS.INTL(startDate, endDate)

Where:

  • startDate is the start of the period in which days are being counted.
  • endDate is the end of the period in which days are being counted.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if the supplied startDate, endDate are not valid dates.

NORM.DIST

The NORM.DIST function calculates the normal distribution for a supplied value of x, and a supplied distribution mean & standard deviation.

Syntax

NORM.DIST(x,mean,standard_deviation,cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value for which you want the distribution.
  • mean is the arithmetic mean of the distribution.
  • standard_deviation is the standard deviation of the distribution.
  • cumulative is a logical value for given function.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if mean or standard_deviation is non-numeric.

#NUM!- occurs if standard_deviation is equal to or less than zero.

NORMDIST

Returns the normal distribution for the specified mean and standard deviation.

Syntax

NORMDIST(x, mean, standard_deviation, cumulative),

Where:

  • x is the value for which you want the distribution.
  • mean is the arithmetic mean of the distribution.
  • standard_deviation is the standard deviation of the distribution.
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of the function. If cumulative is True, NORMDIST returns the cumulative distribution function; if False, it returns the probability mass function.

Remarks

  • standard_deviation must be > 0.
  • The equation for normal density function (cumulative = False) is,
  • When cumulative = True, the formula is the integral from negative infinity to x of the given formula.
  • #VALUE! - occurs if mean is non-numeric.
  • #VALUE! - occurs if standard_deviation is non-numeric.
  • #NUM!- occurs if standard_deviation is equal to or less than zero.

NORMSDIST

NORMSDIST function returns the probability that the observed value of a standard normal random variable will be less than or equal to the parameter.

Syntax

NormsDist(value),

Where:

  • value is a numeric value that checks with the random variable.

NORMINV

Returns the inverse of normal cumulative distribution for the specified mean and standard deviation.

Syntax

NORMINV(probability, mean, standard_deviation),

Where:

  • probability is a probability that corresponds to the normal distribution.
  • mean is the arithmetic mean of the distribution.
  • standard_deviation is the standard deviation of the distribution.

Remarks

#NUM!- if probability is equal to or less than zero.

#NUM!- if probability is equal to or greater than 1.

#VALUE! - if probability is non-numeric.

#VALUE! - if mean is non-numeric.

#NUM!- if standard_deviation is equal to or less than zero.

#VALUE! - if standard_deviation is non-numeric. Given a value for probability, NORMINV seeks value x such that NORMDIST(x, mean, standard_deviation, True) = probability. NORMINV uses an iterative search technique.

NORMSINV

NormsInv function returns the standard normal random variable that has Mean 0 and Standard Deviation 1.

Syntax

NormsInv(value)

Where:

  • value is the probability of the standard deviation.

NORM.S.DIST

NORM.S.DIST function returns the standard normal distribution.

Syntax

NORM.S.DIST(z, cumulative),

Where:

  • z is the value for which you want the distribution.
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of the function.

Remarks

The equation for the standard normal density function is:

NORM.S.INV

NORM.S.INV function returns the inverse of the standard normal cumulative distribution.

Syntax

NORM.S.INV(probability)

Where:

  • probability - probability that corresponds to the normal distribution.

NOT

Reverses the value of its argument.

Syntax

NOT(logical),

Where:

  • logical is a value or expression that can be evaluated to True or False.

NOW

Returns the serial number of the current date and time.

Syntax

NOW( )

Remarks

  • Dates are stored as sequential serial numbers so that they can be used in calculations. By default, January 1, 1900 is serial number 1 and January 1, 2008 is serial number 39448 because it is 39,448 days after January 1, 1900.
  • Numbers to the right of the decimal point in the serial number represent the time; numbers to the left represent the date. For example, the serial number .5 represents the time 12:00 noon.

NPER

Returns the number of periods for an investment based on periodic, constant payments and a constant interest rate.

Syntax

NPER(rate, payment, present_value, future_value, type),

Where:

  • rate is the interest rate per period.
  • payment is the payment made each period; it cannot change over the life of the annuity.
  • present_value is the present value or lump-sum amount that a series of future payments is worth right now.
  • future_value is the future value or a cash balance that you want to attain after the last payment is made. If future_value is omitted, it is assumed to be 0 (the future value of a loan, for example, is 0).
  • type is the number 0 or 1 and indicates when payments are due. If type equals:
    • 0 - Payments are due at the end of the period.
    • 1 - Payments are due at the beginning of the period.

NPV

Calculates the net present value of an investment by using a discount rate and a series of future payments (negative values) and income (positive values).

Syntax

NPV(rate, value1, value2, …),

Where:

  • rate is the rate of discount over the length of one period.
  • value1, value2, … are arguments representing the payments and income.
  • Value1, value2, … must be equally spaced in time and occur at the end of each period.
  • NPV uses the order of value1, value2, … to interpret the order of cash flows. Be sure to enter your payment and income values in the correct sequence.

Remarks

NPV investment begins one period before the date of the value1 cash flow and ends with the last cash flow in the list. NPV calculation is based on future cash flows. If your first cash flow occurs at the beginning of the first period, the first value must be added to the NPV result, not included in the value arguments. If n is the number of cash flows in the list of values, the formula for NPV is,

NUMBERVALUE

The NUMBERVALUE function converts text to a number in a locale-independent way.

Syntax

NUMBERVALUE(text)

Where:

  • text is the text to convert to a number.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if any of the arguments are not valid.

OCT2BIN

The OCT2BIN function converts an octal number into a binary number.

Syntax

OCT2BIN(number, places )

Where:

  • number is the octal number you want to convert.
  • places is the number of characters to use.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number is not a valid octal number and if if places is negative.

#VALUE! - occurs if places is non-numeric.

OCT2HEX

The OCT2HEX function converts an octal number into a hexadecimal number.

Syntax

OCT2HEX(number, places)

Where:

  • number is the octal number you want to convert.
  • places is the number of characters to use.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number is not a valid octal number and if if places is negative.
#VALUE! - occurs if places is non-numeric.

OCT2DEC

The decimal value converts to an octal number.

Syntax

OCT2DEC(number)

Where:

  • number is the octal number you want to convert.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if number is not a valid octal number.

ODD

Returns the number rounded up to the nearest odd integer.

Syntax

ODD(number),

Where:

  • number is the value to be rounded off.

Remarks

Regardless of the sign of a number, a value is rounded up when adjusted away from zero. If the number is an odd integer, no rounding occurs.

OFFSET

The Offset function returns a reference to a range that is offset a number of rows and columns from any given range or cell.

Syntax

Offset( range, rows, columns, height, width )

Where:

  • range is the starting range from which you want to apply the offset.
  • rows is the number of rows you want to apply as the offset to the range. This can be either a positive or negative number.
  • columns is the number of columns you want to apply as the offset to the range. This can be either a positive or a negative number.
  • height is the number of rows that you want the returned range to be.
  • width is the number of columns that you want the returned range to be.

OR

Returns True if any argument is true; returns False if all arguments are false.

Syntax

OR(logical1, logical2, …),

Where:

  • logical1, logical2, … are conditions you want to test that can be either True or False.

Remarks

The arguments must evaluate to logical values such as True or False or in arrays or references that contain logical values.

PEARSON

Returns the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient, r, a dimensionless index that ranges from -1.0 to 1.0 inclusive and reflects the extent of linear relationship between two data sets.

Syntax

PEARSON(array1, array2),

Where:

  • array1 is a set of independent values.
  • array2 is a set of dependent values.

Remarks

The arguments must be either numbers or names, array constants or references that contain numbers. The formula for the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient, r, is, where x-bar and y-bar are the sample means AVERAGE(array1) and AVERAGE(array2).

PERCENTILE

Returns the k-th percentile of values in a range.

Syntax

PERCENTILE(array, k),

Where:

  • array is the array or range of data that defines relative standing.
  • k is the percentile value in the range 0..1, inclusive.

Remarks

k must be >=10 and <= 1. If k is not a multiple of 1/(n - 1), PERCENTILE interpolates to determine the value at the k-th percentile.

PERCENTILE.EXC

PERCENTILE.EXC function returns the k-th percentile of values in a range, where k is in the range of 0 to 1, exclusively.

Syntax

PERCENTILE.EXC(array, k)

Where:

  • array is the range of data that defines relative standing.
  • k is the percentile value in the range of 0 to 1.

Remarks

  • #NUM!- occurs if k is equal to or less than zero.
  • #NUM!- occurs if the array is empty.
  • #NUM!- occurs if k is equal to or greater than 1.
  • #VALUE! - occurs if k is non-numeric.

PERCENTILE.INC

PERCENTILE.INC function returns the k-th percentile of values in a range, where k is in the range 0 to 1.

Syntax

PERCENTILE.INC(array, k)

Where:

  • array is the range of data that defines relative standing.
  • k is the percentile value in the range 0 to 1.

Remarks

  • #NUM!- occurs if k is equal to or less than zero.
  • #NUM!- occurs if array is empty.
  • #NUM!- occurs if k is equal to or greater than 1.
  • #VALUE! - occurs if k is non-numeric.

PERCENTRANK

Returns the rank of a value in data set as a percentage of data set.

Syntax

PERCENTRANK(array, x, significance),

Where:

  • array is the range of data with numeric values that defines relative standing.
  • x is the value for which you want to know the rank.
  • significance is an optional value that identifies the number of significant digits for the returned percentage value. If omitted, PERCENTRANK uses three digits (0.xxx).

Remarks

  • Significance must be >= 1.
  • If x does not match one of the values in the array, PERCENTRANK interpolates to return the correct percentage rank.

PERCENTRANK.EXC

PERCENTRANK.EXC function returns the rank of a value in data set as a percentage (0 to 1, exclusively) of the data set.

Syntax

PERCENTRANK.EXC(array, x, significance)

Where:

  • array is the range of data that defines relative standing.
  • x is value for which you want to know the rank.
  • significance is an optional value that identifies the number of significant digits for the returned percentage value.

Remarks

  • #NUM!- occurs if this argument is empty.
  • #NUM!- occurs if the argument is less than one.

PERMUT

Returns the number of permutations for a given number of objects that can be selected from a number of objects.

Syntax

PERMUT(number, number_chosen),

Where:

  • number is an integer that describes the number of objects.
  • number_chosen is an integer that describes the number of objects in each permutation.

Remarks

Number must be > 0 and number_chosen must be >= 0. Number must be >= number_chosen. The equation for the number of permutations is,

PERMUTATIONA

PERMUTATIONA function returns the number of permutations for a given number of objects (with repetitions) that can be selected from the total number of objects.

Syntax

PERMUTATIONA(number, number-chosen)

Where:

  • number is an integer that describes the total number of objects.
  • number-chosen is an integer that describes the number of objects in each permutation.

Remarks

  • #VALUE! - occurs if numeric arguments use data types that are non-numeric.
  • #NUM!- occurs if numeric arguments are values that are not valid. Both arguments are truncated to integers.

PI

Returns the number 3.14159265358979, the mathematical constant pi, accurate to 15 digits.

Syntax

PI( )

PMT

Calculates the payment for a loan based on constant payments and constant interest rate.

Syntax

PMT(rate, number_of_periods, present_value, future_value, type)

Where:

  • rate is the interest rate for the loan.
  • number_of_periods is the total number of payments for the loan.
  • present_value is the present value or the total amount that a series of future payments is worth now; also known as the principal.
  • future_value is the future value or cash balance you want to attain after the last payment is made. If future_value is omitted, it is assumed to be 0 (zero), that is, the future value of a loan is 0.
  • type is the number 0 (zero) or 1 and indicates when payments are due. If type equals:
    • 0 - Payments are due at the end of the period.
    • 1 - Payments are due at the beginning of the period.

Remarks

The payment returned by PMT includes principal and interest, but no taxes, reserve payments, or fees sometimes associated with loans.
Make sure that you are consistent about the units you use for specifying rate and number_of_periods. If you make monthly payments on a four-year loan at an annual interest rate of 12 percent, use 12%/12 for rate and 4*12 for number_of_periods. If you make annual payments on the same loan, use 12 percent for rate and 4 for number_of_periods.

POISSON

Returns the Poisson distribution.

Syntax

POISSON(x, mean, cumulative),

Where:

  • x is the number of events.
  • mean is the expected numeric value.
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of probability distribution returned. If cumulative is True, POISSON returns the cumulative Poisson probability that the number of random events occurring will be between zero and x inclusive; if False, it returns the Poisson probability mass function that the number of events occurring will be exactly x.

POISSON.DIST

The POISSON.DIST function calculates the Poisson Probability Mass Function or the Cumulative Poisson Probability Function for a supplied set of parameters.
POISSON.DIST(x,mean,cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the number of events.
  • mean is the expected numeric value.
  • cumulative is a logical value that determines the form of the probability distribution returned.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if x is not an integer.
#NUM!- occurs if x or mean is non-numeric and s if x < 0.

POW

Pow function returns the number raised to the specified power.

Syntax

POW(number, power)

Where:

  • number is the base number. It can be any real number.
  • power is the exponent to which, the base number is raised.

POWER

Returns the result of a number raised to a power.

Syntax

POWER(number, power),

Where:

  • number is the base number. It can be any real number.
  • power is the exponent to which the base number is raised.

PPMT

Returns the payment on the principal for a given period, for an investment based on periodic, constant payments and a constant interest rate.

Syntax

PPMT(rate, per, number_of_periods, present_value, future_value, type),

Where:

  • rate is the interest rate per period.
  • per specifies the period and must be in the range of 1 to number_of_periods.
  • number_of_periods is the total number of payment periods in an annuity.
  • present_value is the present value - the total amount that a series of future payments is worth now.
  • future_value is the future value or a cash balance that you may want to attain after the last payment is made. If future_value is omitted, it is assumed to be 0 (zero), that is, the future value of a loan is 0.
  • type is the number 0 or 1 and indicates when payments are due. If type equals:
    • 0 - Payments are due at the end of the period.
    • 1 - Payments are due at the beginning of the period.

Remarks

  • Make sure that you are consistent about the units you use for specifying rate and number_of_periods. If you make monthly payments on a four-year loan at 12 percent annual interest, use 12%/12 for rate and 4*12 for number_of_periods. If you make annual payments on the same loan, use 12% for rate and 4 for number_of_periods.

PROB

Returns the probability whose values are in a range between two limits. If upper_limit is not supplied, returns the probability that values in x_range are equal to lower_limit.

Syntax

PROB(x_range, prob_range, lower_limit, upper_limit),

Where:

  • x_range is the range of numeric values of x with which there are associated probabilities.
  • prob_range is a set of probabilities associated with values in x_range.
  • lower_limit is the lower bound on the value for which you want a probability.
  • upper_limit is the optional upper bound on the value for which you want a probability.

Remarks

  • Any value in prob_range must be > 0 and < 1.
  • If upper_limit is omitted, PROB returns the probability of being equal to lower_limit.

PRODUCT

Multiplies all the numbers given as arguments and returns the product.

Syntax

PRODUCT(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are numbers that you want to multiply.

PROPER

The PROPER function changes the first letter of text into a capital letter and following letters changes to lowercases.

Syntax

PROPER(text)

Where:

  • text is the string which you want to capitalize the first letter.

PV

Returns the present value of an investment. The present value is the total amount that a series of future payments is worth now.

Syntax

PV(rate, number_of_periods, payment, future_value, type),

Where:

  • rate is the interest rate per period. For example, if you obtain an automobile loan at 10% annual interest rate and make monthly payments, your interest rate per month is 10%/12 or 0.83%. You would enter 10%/12 or 0.83% or 0.0083, into the formula as the rate.
  • number_of_periods is the total number of payment periods in an annuity. For example, if you get a four-year car loan and make monthly payments, your loan has 4*12 (or 48) periods. You would enter 48 into the formula for number_of_periods.
  • payment is the payment made for each period and cannot change over the life of the annuity. Typically, payment includes principal and interest, but no other fees or taxes. For example, the monthly payments on $10,000, four-year car loan at 12 percent are $263.33. You will have to enter 263.33 into the formula as the payment. If payment is omitted, you must include the future_value argument.
  • future_value is the future value or a cash balance that you want to attain after the last payment is made. If future_value is omitted, it is assumed to be 0 (the future value of a loan, for example, is 0). For example, if you want to save $50,000 to pay for a special project in 18 years, then $50,000 is the future value. You could then make a conservative guess at an interest rate and determine how much you must save each month. If future_value is omitted, you must include the payment argument.
  • type is the number 0 or 1 and indicates when payments are due. If type equals:
    • 0 - Payments are due at the end of the period.
    • 1 - Payments are due at the beginning of the period.

Remarks

  • Make sure that you are consistent about the units you use for specifying rate and number_of_periods. If you make monthly payments on a four-year loan at 12 percent annual interest, use 12%/12 for rate and 4*12 for number_of_periods. If you make annual payments on the same loan, use 12% for rate and 4 for number_of_periods.
  • In annuity functions, the cash you pay out such as a deposit to savings is represented by a negative number; the cash you receive such as a dividend check is represented by a positive number.
  • One financial argument is solved in terms of the others. If rate is not 0, then, If rate is 0, then, (payment * number_of_periods) + present_value + future_value = 0

QUARTILE

Returns the quartile of a data set.

Syntax

QUARTILE(array, quart),

Where:

  • array is the array or cell range of numeric values for which you want the quartile value.
  • quart indicates which value to return.

QUARTILE.EXC

The QUARTILE.EXC function returns a requested quartile of a supplied range of values, based on a percentile range of 0 to 1 exclusive.

Syntax

QUARTILE.EXC(array, quart)

Where:

  • array is the range of numeric values.
  • quart shows which value to return.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if the array is empty or if quart ≤ 0 or if quart ≥ 4.

QUARTILE.INC

The QUARTILE.INC function returns a requested quartile of a supplied range of values, based on a percentile range of 0 to 1 inclusive.
QUARTILE.INC(array,quart)

Where:

  • array is the array range of numeric values.
  • quart shows which value to return

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if the array is empty or if quart ≤ 0 or if quart ≥ 4.

QUOTIENT

QUOTIENT function returns the integer portion of a division between two given numbers. The returned value will be integer value.

Syntax

QUOTIENT (numerator, denominator) Numerator – Required. Denominator – Required.

RADIANS

Converts degrees to radians.

Syntax

RADIANS(angle),

Where:

  • angle is an angle in degrees that you want to convert.

RAND

Returns an evenly distributed random number greater than or equal to 0 and less than 1.

Syntax

RAND( )

RANDBETWEEN

RANDBETWEEN function returns a random number that is between the given ranges. This function returns a new random number each time in recalculation.

Syntax

RANDBETWEEN (start_number, end_number),

Where:

  • start_number– is the smallest integer.
  • end_number– is the largest integer.

RANK

Returns the rank of a number in a list of numbers. The rank of a number is its size relative to other values in a list. (If you were to sort the list, the rank of the number would be its position)

Syntax

RANK(number, ref, order)

Where:

  • number is the number whose rank you want to find.
  • ref is an array or a reference to a list of numbers.
  • order is a number specifying how to rank numbers.

RANK.AVG

The RANK.AVG function returns the statistical rank of a given value, within a supplied array of values. If there are duplicate values in the list, the average rank is returned.

Syntax

RANK.AVG(number,ref)

Where:

  • number is the rank you want to find.
  • ref is a reference to, a list of numbers.

RANK.EQ

The RANK.EQ function returns the statistical rank of a given value, within a supplied array of values.

Syntax

RANK.EQ( number, ref )

Where:

  • number is the value for which you want to find the rank.
  • ref is an array of values containing the supplied number.

RATE

Returns the interest rate per period of an annuity. RATE is calculated by iteration and may not converge to a unique solution.

Syntax

RATE(number_of_periods, payment, present_value, future_value, type, guess)

Where:

  • number_of_periods is the total number of payment periods in an annuity.
  • payment is the payment made for each period and cannot change over the life of the annuity. Typically, payment includes the principal and interest, but no other fees or taxes. If payment is omitted, you must include the future_value argument.
  • present_value is the present value - the total amount that a series of future payments is worth now.
  • future_value is the future value or cash balance that you want to attain after the last payment is made. If future_value is omitted, it is assumed to be 0 (the future value of a loan, for example, is 0).
  • type is the number 0 or 1 and indicates when payments are due. If type equals:

RECEIVED

Received function returns the amount received at maturity for a fully invested security.

Syntax

RECEIVED(settlement, maturity, investment, discount, basis)

Where:

  • maturity - security’s maturity date.
  • settlement - security’s settlement date.
  • discount - security’s discount rate.
  • basis - type of day count basis.

REPLACE

The REPLACE function replaces a certain part of text with a different part of text based on the number of characters given.

Syntax

REPLACE(oldText, start_number, numeric_chars, newText)

Where:

  • oldText is the text that needs to be replaced.
  • startNumber is the position of the character in oldText
  • numeric_chars is the number of characters that is need to be replaced
  • newText is the text that replaces the character in old text.

REPLACEB

The REPLACEB function replaces a certain part of text with a different part of text based on the number of bytes given.

Syntax

REPLACEB(oldText, start_number, number_bytes, newText)

Where:

  • oldText is the text that needs to be replaced.
  • startNumber is the position of the character in oldText
  • number_bytes is the number of bytes that is need to be replaced,
  • newText is the text that replaces the character in old text.

REPT

The REPT function returns a supplied text string, repeated a specified number of times.

Syntax

REPT(string, number)

Where:

  • string is the text that you want to repeat.
  • number is the number of times to repeat the text.

Remarks

Blank text - occurs if number is zero.

RIGHT returns the last character or characters in a text string based on the number of characters you specify.

Syntax

RIGHT(text, numeric_chars),

Where:

  • text is the text string containing the characters you want to extract.
  • numeric_charsspecifies the number of characters you want RIGHT to extract.

RIGHTB

The RIGHTB function returns the last character or characters in a string, based on the number of bytes you specify for double-byte character set (DBCS) languages.

Syntax

RIGHTB(string, number)

Where:

  • string contains the characters you want to return.
  • number specifies the number of characters.

ROMAN

The ROMAN function converts an Arabic number to a Roman numeral. This function returns a text string depicting the Roman numeral form of the given number.

Syntax

ROMAN( number, (form) )

Where:

  • number – Required. If number is not an integer, then it will be rounded down.
  • form – Optional, this value will specify the style of the Roman numeral.

ROUND

Rounds a number to a specified number of digits.

Syntax

ROUND(number, number_digits),

Where:

  • number is the number you want to round off.
  • number_digitsspecifies the number of digits you want to round off.

ROUNDDOWN

Rounds a number down towards zero.

Syntax

ROUNDDOWN(number, number_digits),

Where:

  • number is any real number that you want rounded down.
  • number_digits is the number of digits to which you want to round a number.

Remark

ROUNDDOWN behaves like ROUND, except that it always rounds a number down.

ROUNDUP

Rounds a number up away from 0 (zero).

Syntax

ROUNDUP(number, number_digits),

Where:

  • number is any real number that you want rounded up.
  • number_digits is the number of digits to which you want to round a number.

Remarks

ROUNDUP behaves like ROUND, except that it always rounds a number up.

ROW

The ROW function returns the first row number within a supplied reference, or if no reference is supplied, the function returns the number of the current row in the currently active spreadsheet..
ROW( [reference] )

Where:

  • reference is an optional argument that you want to return the row number of. If [reference] is omitted, the function returns the row number of the current cell (i.e. the cell that the function is entered into).

ROWS

The ROWS function takes a range and returns the number of rows that are contained within the range.

Syntax

ROWS( array )

Where:

  • array argument is the range in which you want to count the number of rows.

RRI

The RRI function returns an equivalent interest rate when investment value increases.

Syntax

RRI(number_of_periods,present_value,future_value)

Where:

  • number_of_periods is the number of investment period.
  • present_value is the present investment value.
  • future_value is the future investment value.

RSQ

Returns the square of the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient through data points in known_y’s and known_x’s.

Syntax

RSQ(known_y’s, known_x’s),

Where:

  • known_y’s is an array or range of data points.
  • known_x’s is an array or range of data points.

Remarks

  • The equation for the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient is,

Where:

  • x-bar and y-bar are the sample means AVERAGE(known_x’s) and AVERAGE(known_y’s).
  • RSQ returns r2, which is the square of this correlation coefficient.

SEARCH function returns the location of a substring in a string. This function is NOT case-sensitive.

Syntax

SEARCH(substring, string, [start_position] )

Where:

  • substring: Required. The text to be found.
  • string:Required. The text in which to search for the value of the substring.
  • start_number: Optional. The starting position for searching the string.

SEARCHB

The SEARCHB function finds one text string (find_text) within another text string (within_text), and returns the number of the starting position of find_text for double-byte character set (DBCS) languages.

Syntax

SEARCHB(findText,withinText, start_number )

Where:

  • findText is the text that you want to find.
  • withinText is the text in which you want to search for findText.
  • start_number is the character number in withinText, at which you want to start the search.

SEC

SEC function returns the secant of an angle.

Syntax

SEC(number)

Where:

number - angle radians for which you want the secant

SECH

SECH function returns the hyperbolic secant of an angle.

Syntax

SECH(number)

Where:

  • number - angle radians for which you want the secant

SECOND

Returns the seconds of time value. The second is given as an integer in the range 0 (zero) to 59.

Syntax

SECOND(serial_number),

Where:

  • serial_number is the time that contains the seconds you want to find.

SERIESSUM

SEIESSUM returns the sum of a power series.

Syntax:

SERIESSUM( x, n, m, coefficients )

Where:

  • x is the input value for power series.
  • n is the initial power to which x to raise.
  • m is step by increased n for each time in the series
  • coefficients are multiply by power of x.

SHEET

The SHEET function returns the sheet number of the reference sheet.

Syntax

SHEET(value)

Where:

  • value is an optional argument with the name of a sheet for which you want the sheet number.

Remarks

#REF! - occurs if value argument is not a valid value.

#NA - occurs if value argument is a sheet name that is not valid.

SHEETS

SHEETS function returns the number of sheets in a reference.

Syntax

SHEETS(reference)

Where:

  • reference is an optional argument with the name of a sheet for which you want to know the number of sheets.

Remarks

#REF! - occurs if reference is not a valid value.

SIGN

Determines the sign of a number. Returns 1 if the number is positive, zero (0) if the number is 0 and -1 if the number is negative.

Syntax

SIGN(number),

Where:

  • number is any real number.

SIN

Returns the sine of the given angle.

Syntax

SIN(number),

Where:

  • number is the angle in radians for which you want the sine.

SINH

Returns the hyperbolic sine of a number.

Syntax

SINH(number),

Where:

  • number is any real number.

SKEW

Returns the skewness of a distribution. Skewness characterizes the degree of asymmetry of a distribution around its mean.

Syntax

SKEW(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2 … are arguments for which you want to calculate the skewness. You can also use a single array or a reference to an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

SKEW.P

Returns the skewness of a distribution based on population, characterization of the degree of asymmetry of a distribution around its mean.

Syntax

SKEW.P(number 1, [number 2],…)

Where:

  • Number1 is required, and subsequent numbers are optional.
  • Number2,… up to 254 can be used and they are numbers or names, arrays, or references that contain numbers for which you want the population skewness.

SLN

Returns the straight-line depreciation of an asset for one period.

Syntax

SLN(cost,salvage, life)

Where:

  • cost is the initial cost of the asset.
  • salvage is the value at the end of the depreciation (sometimes called the salvage value of the asset).
  • life is the number of periods over which the asset is depreciated (the useful life of the asset).

SLOPE

Returns the slope of the linear regression line through data points in known_y’s and known_x’s. The slope is the rate of change along the regression line.

Syntax

SLOPE(known_y’s, known_x’s),

Where:

  • known_y’s is an array or cell range of numeric dependent data points.
  • known_x’s is the set of independent data points.

SMALL

Returns the k-th smallest value in a data set.

Syntax

SMALL(array, k),

Where:

  • array is an array or range of numerical data for which you want to determine the k-th smallest value.
  • k is the position (from the smallest) in the array or range of data to return.

SQRT

Returns a positive square root.

Syntax

SQRT(number),

Where:

  • number is the number for which you want the square root.

Remarks

Number must be >= 0.

SQRTPI

SQRTPI function returns the square root of a given number multiplied by π. Here π is the constant math value.

Syntax

SQRTPI (number) number – Required.

STANDARDIZE

Returns a normalized value from a distribution characterized by mean and standard_deviation.

Syntax

STANDARDIZE(x,mean, standard_deviation)

Where:

  • x is the value that you want to normalize.
  • mean is the arithmetic mean of the distribution.
  • standard_deviation is the standard deviation of the distribution.

STDEV

Estimates the standard deviation based on a sample. The standard deviation is a measure of how widely values are dispersed from the average value (the mean).

Syntax

STDEV(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are number arguments corresponding to a sample of a population.

STDEV.P

The STDEV.P function calculates the standard deviation of a supplied set of values.

Syntax

STDEV.P(number1,[number2],…])

Where:

  • number1 is the first number argument corresponding to a population.
  • number2, … are the arguments 2 to 254 corresponding to a population.

Remarks

  • Arguments can either be numbers or names, arrays, or references that contain numbers.
  • The standard deviation is calculated using the “n” method.
  • Arguments that are error values or text that cannot be translated into numbers cause errors.

STDEVA

Estimates standard deviation based on a sample. Standard deviation is a measure of how widely values are dispersed from the average value (the mean). Text and logical values such as True and False are also included in the calculation.

Syntax

STDEVA(value1, value2, …),

Where:

  • value1, value2, … are values corresponding to a sample population. You can also use a single array or a reference to an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

STDEVP

Calculates standard deviation based on the entire population given as arguments.

Syntax

STDEVP(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are 1 to 30 number arguments corresponding to population. You can also use a single array or a reference to an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

STDEVPA

Calculates the standard deviation based on the entire population given as arguments, including text and logical values.

Syntax

STDEVPA(value1, value2, …),

Where:

  • value1, value2, … are values corresponding to a population. You can also use a single array or a reference to an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

STDEV.S

Based on a sample, STDEV.S function estimates standard deviation.

Syntax

STDEV.S(number1,[number2],…])

Where:

  • number1 is the first number argument corresponding to a population.
  • number2, … are the arguments 2 to 254 corresponding to a population.

STEYX

Returns the standard error of the predicted y-value for each x in the regression.

Syntax

STEYX(known_y’s, known_x’s),

Where:

  • known_y’s is an array or range of dependent data points.
  • known_x’s is an array or range of independent data points.

SUBSTITUTE

Substitutes new_text for old_text in a text string. Use SUBSTITUTE when you want to replace specific text in a text string; use REPLACE when you want to replace any text that occurs in a specific location in a text string.

Syntax

SUBSTITUTE(text, old_text, new_text, instance_number)

Where:

  • text is the text or the reference to a cell containing text for which you want to substitute characters.
  • old_text is the text you want to replace.
  • new_text is the text you want to replace old_text with
  • instance_numberspecifies which occurrence of old_text you want to replace with new_text. If you specify instance_number, only that instance of old_text is replaced. Otherwise, every occurrence of old_text in text is changed to new_text.

SUBTOTAL

SUBTOTAL function returns a subtotal in a list. Once the subtotal list is created, you can modify it by editing the SUBTOTAL function.

Syntax

SUBTOTAL (function_Number, ref1, (ref2),…) function_Number is required. This specifies which function to use in calculating subtotals within a list. Here is the list of functions supported by Syncfusion: ref1 The first named range which is used for the subtotal. This value is required. ref2 This value is optional.

SUM

Sum function adds all numbers in a range of cells and returns the result.

Syntax

Sum(number1, number2, … number_n)

Where:

  • number1 is the first number, number2 is the second and number_n is the nth number to be added together.

SUMIF

Adds the cells specified by a given criteria.

Syntax

SUMIF(range, criteria, sum_range),

Where:

  • range is the range of cells you want evaluated.
  • criteria is the criteria in the form of a number, expression, or text that defines the cells to be added. For example, criteria can be expressed as “>32” or some other logical expression.
  • Sum_range is the actual cells to sum.

SUMIFS

SUMIFS function sums the values in a given array that satisfies a set of given criteria.

Syntax

SUMIFS(sum_range, criteria_range1, criteria1, [criteria_range2, criteria2], …)

Where:

  • criteria_range1:Array of values to be tested against the given criteria.
  • criteria1: The condition to be tested on each of the values of given range.
  • sum_range: The range of values to be summed if the associated criteria range meets the specified criteria.

NOTE

Cells in the sum_range argument that contain TRUE evaluate to 1; cells in sum_range that contain FALSE evaluate to 0 (zero).

SUMPRODUCT

Multiplies corresponding components in the given arrays and returns the sum of those products.

Syntax

SUMPRODUCT(array1, array2, array3, …),

Where:

  • array1, array2, array3, … are 2 to 30 arrays whose components you will want to multiply and then add.

Remarks

  • The array arguments must have the same dimensions.
  • SUMPRODUCT treats array entries that are not numeric as if they were zeros.

SUMSQ

Returns the sum of the squares of the arguments.

Syntax

SUMSQ(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are arguments for which you want the sum of the squares. You can also use a single array or a reference to an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

SUMX2MY2

Returns the sum of the difference of squares of corresponding values in two arrays.

Syntax

SUMX2MY2(array_x, array_y)

Where:

  • array_x is the first array or range of values.
  • array_y is the second array or range of values.

SUMX2PY2

Returns the sum of the sum of squares of corresponding values in two arrays. The sum of the sum of squares is a common term in many statistical calculations.

Syntax

SUMX2PY2(array_x, array_y)

Where:

  • array_x is the first array or range of values.
  • array_y is the second array or range of values.

SUMXMY2

Returns the sum of squares of differences of corresponding values in two arrays.

Syntax

SUMXMY2(array_x, array_y)

Where:

  • array_x is the first array or range of values.
  • array_y is the second array or range of values.

SYD

Returns the sum-of-years digits depreciation of an asset for a specified period.

Syntax

SYD(cost, salvage, life, per)

Where:

  • cost is the initial cost of the asset.
  • salvage is the value at the end of the depreciation (sometimes called the salvage value of the asset).
  • life is the number of periods over which the asset is depreciated (sometimes called the useful life of the asset).
  • per is the period and must use the same units as life.

T

T function tests whether the given value is text or not. If the given value is text, then it returns the given text. Otherwise, the function returns an empty text string.

Syntax

T( value ),

Where:

  • value is a value to be checked.

T.DIST

‘T.DIST’ function returns the left-tailed t-distribution.

Syntax

T.DIST(x,degree_freedom, tails)

Where:

  • x is the numeric value to evaluate the distribution.
  • degree_freedom is the number of degrees of freedom.

T.INV

Returns the the inverse of the two-tailed t-distribution. It’s must be > 0.

Syntax

T.INV(probability,degree_freedom)

Where:

  • probability associated with the Student’s t-distribution.
  • degree_freedom is the number of degrees of freedom. It’s must be > 0.

TAN

Returns the tangent of the given angle.

Syntax

TAN(number),

Where:

  • number is the angle in radians for which you want the tangent.

TANH

Returns the hyperbolic tangent of a number.

Syntax

TANH(number),

Where:

  • number is any real number.

TEXT

Converts a value to text in a specific number format.

Syntax

TEXT(value, format_text),

Where:

  • value is a numeric value, formula that evaluates to a numeric value, or reference to a cell containing numeric value.
  • format_text is a number format in text form in the Category box of Number tab in the Format Cells dialog box.

TIME

Returns the decimal number for a particular time. The decimal number returned by TIME is a value ranging from 0 (zero) to 0.99999999, representing the times from 0:00:00 (12:00:00 A.M.) to 23:59:59 (11:59:59 P.M.).

Syntax

TIME(hour, minute, second),

Where:

  • hour is a number from 0 (zero) to 23 representing the hour.
  • minute is a number from 0 to 59 representing the minute.
  • second is a number from 0 to 59 representing the second.

TIMEVALUE

Returns the decimal number of the time represented by a text string. The decimal number is a value ranging from 0 (zero) to 0.99999999, representing the times from 0:00:00 (12:00:00 A.M.) to 23:59:59 (11:59:59 P.M.).

Syntax

TIMEVALUE(time_text),

Where:

  • time_text is a text string that represents time as a formatted string; for example, “6:45 PM” and “18:45” text strings within quotation marks that represent time.

TODAY

Returns the serial number of the current date. The serial number is the number of days since Jan 1, 1900.

Syntax

TODAY( )

TRANSPOSE

The TRANSPOSE function copies a horizontal range of cells into a vertical range and vice versa.

Syntax

TRANSPOSE( array )

Where:

  • array argument is a range of spreadsheet cells.

TRIM

Trim function returns a text value with the leading and trailing spaces removed.

Syntax

Trim(text)

Where:

  • text is the text value for which you want to remove the leading and trailing spaces.

TRIMMEAN

Returns the mean of the interior of a data set. TRIMMEAN calculates the mean taken by excluding a percentage of data points from the top and bottom tails of data set.

Syntax

TRIMMEAN(array, percent)

Where:

  • array is the array or range of values to trim and average.
  • percent is the fractional number of data points to exclude from the calculation. For example, if percent = 0.2, 4 points are trimmed from a data set of 20 points (20 x 0.2): 2 from the top and 2 from the bottom of the set.

TRUNC

TRUNC function truncates a supplied number to a specified number of decimal places.

Syntax

TRUNC(number, number_digits),

Where:

  • number is the number you want to truncate.
  • number_digits is an optional argument that specifies the number of decimal places to truncate the supplied number to. The default value is 0.

TRUE

TRUE function returns the logical value when the given sting value is true.

Syntax

True(string value)

Where:

  • string value is to provide any text value or empty string.

TYPE

The TYPE function receives a value and returns an integer that represents the supplied value’s data type.

Syntax

TYPE( value )

Where:

  • value can be input either directly, as a value returned from a formula, or as a reference to a cell that contains a value.

UNICHAR

The UNICHAR function retrieves the Unicode character for a given numeric value.

Syntax

UNICHAR(number)

Where:

  • number is the Unicode number that represents the character.

Remarks

#N/A - occurs if data types are not valid.

#VALUE! - occurs if number fall outside the allowable range, if number is zero.

UNICODE

The UNICODE function calculates the number corresponding to the first character of the text.

Syntax

UNICODE(text)

Where:

  • text is the character for which you want the Unicode value.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if data types is not valid.

UPPER

Upper function converts all characters in a text string to uppercase.

Syntax

Upper(text)

Where:

  • text is the string you want to convert to uppercase.

VALUE

Converts a text string that represents a number to a number.

Syntax

VALUE(text)

Where:

  • text is the text enclosed in quotation marks or a reference to a cell containing the text you want to convert.

VAR

Estimates variance based on a sample.

Syntax

VAR(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are arguments corresponding to a sample of a population.

VARA

Estimates variance based on a sample. In addition to numbers and text, logical values such as True and False are included in the calculation.

Syntax

VARA(value1, value2, …),

Where:

  • value1, value2, … are value arguments corresponding to a sample of a population.

VARP

Calculates variance based on the entire population.

Syntax

VARP(number1, number2, …),

Where:

  • number1, number2, … are number arguments corresponding to a population.

VARPA

Calculates variance based on the entire population. In addition to numbers and text, logical values such as True and False are also included in the calculation.

Syntax

VARPA(value1, value2, …),

Where:

  • value1, value2, … are arguments corresponding to a population.

VDB

Returns the depreciation of an asset for any period you specify, including partial periods, using the double-declining balance method or some other method you specify. VDB stands for variable declining balance.

Syntax

VDB(cost, salvage, life, start_period, end_period, factor, no_switch)

Where:

  • cost is the initial cost of the asset.
  • salvage is the value at the end of the depreciation (sometimes called the salvage value of the asset).
  • life is the number of periods over which the asset is depreciated (sometimes called the useful life of the asset).
  • start_period is the starting period for which you want to calculate the depreciation. start_period must use the same units as life.
  • end_period is the ending period for which you want to calculate the depreciation. end_period must use the same units as life.
  • factor is the rate at which the balance declines. If factor is omitted, it is assumed to be 2 (the double-declining balance method).
  • no_switch is a logical value specifying whether to switch to straight-line depreciation when depreciation is greater than the declining balance calculation.
    • If no_switch is True, straight-line depreciation is not used even when the depreciation is greater than the declining balance calculation.
    • If no_switch is False or omitted, straight-line depreciation is used when depreciation is greater than the declining balance calculation. All arguments except no_switch must be positive numbers.

VLOOKUP

Searches for a value in the left most column of a table and then returns a value in the same row from a column you specify in the table. Use VLOOKUP instead of HLOOKUP when your comparison values are located in a column to the left of the data you want to find. The V in VLOOKUP stands for “Vertical.”

Syntax

VLOOKUP(lookup_value, table_array, col_index_number, range_lookup)

Where:

  • lookup_value is the value to be found in the first column of the array. Lookup_value can be a value, a reference, or a text string.
  • table_array is the table of information in which data is looked up. Use a reference to a range or a range name.
  • col_index_number is the column number in table_array from which the matching value must be returned. Col_index_number of 1 returns the value in the first column of the table_array; col_index_number of 2 returns the value in the second column of the table_array, and so on.
  • range_lookup is a logical value that specifies whether you want VLOOKUP to find an exact match or an approximate match. If True or omitted, an approximate match is returned. In other words, if an exact match is not found, the next largest value that is less than the lookup_value is returned.

WEBSERVICE

WEBSERVICE function retrieves data from a web service on the Internet.

Syntax:

WEBSERVICE(url)

Where:

  • URL is the URL of the web service.

Remarks:

#VALUE! - occurs if URL is unable to return the data, if URL result in a string that is not valid and if URL is a string that contains more than the 2048 characters.

WEEKDAY

Returns the day of the week corresponding to a date. The day is given as an integer, ranging from 1 (Sunday) to 7 (Saturday) by default.

Syntax

WEEKDAY(serial_number, return_type),

Where:

  • serial_number is a sequential number that represents the date of the day you are trying to find. Dates should be entered by using the DATE function or as results of other formulas or functions. For example, use DATE(2008,5,23) for the 23rd day of May 2008.
  • return_type is a number that determines the type of return value.

WEEKNUM

For a supplied a date, the WEEKNUM function returns an integer representing the week number (from 1 to 53) of the year.

Syntax

WEEKNUM( serial_number, [returnType] )

Where:

  • serial_number is the date that you want to return the week number for.
  • [returnType] is an optional argument that specifies which numbering system should be used and which weekday should be treated as the start of the week.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if the supplied serial_number cannot be recognized as a numeric value or a date.

#NUM!- occurs if the supplied [returnType] argument is not one of the above listed permitted values.

#NUM!- occurs if the supplied serial_number argument is numeric but is out of range for the current date base.

WEIBULL

Returns the Weibull distribution.

Syntax

WEIBULL(x, alpha, beta, cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value at which to evaluate the function.
  • alpha is a parameter to the distribution.
  • beta is a parameter to the distribution.
  • cumulative determines the form of the function.

WEIBULL.DIST

WEIBULL.DIST function returns the Weibull distribution.

Syntax

WEIBULL.DIST(x,alpha,beta,cumulative)

Where:

  • x is the value at which to evaluate the function.
  • alpha is a parameter of the distribution.
  • beta is a parameter of the distribution.
  • cumulative determines the form of the function.

WORKDAY

The WORKDAY function returns a date that is a supplied number of working days (excluding weekends and holidays) ahead of a given start date.

Syntax

WORKDAY(startDate, Days, [holidays] )

Where:

  • startDate is the initial date from which to count the number of workdays.
  • Days are number of workdays to add onto startDate.
  • [holidays] is an optional argument, which specifies an array of dates that are not to be counted as working days.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if the supplied startDate plus the supplied days argument results in an invalid date.

#VALUE! - occurs if the supplied startDate or any of the values in the supplied [holidays] array are not valid dates, if the supplied days argument is non-numeric.

WORKDAY.INTL

The WORKDAY.INTL function returns a date that is a supplied number of working days (excluding weekends and holidays) ahead of a given start date.

Syntax

WORKDAY.INTL( startDate, days, [weekend], [holidays] )

Where:

  • startDate is the initial date from which to count the number of workdays.
  • days are number of workdays to add onto startDate.
  • [weekend] is an optional argument, which specifies which weekdays should be counted as weekends.
  • [holidays] is an optional argument, which specifies an array of dates that are not to be counted as working days.

Remarks

#NUM!- occurs if the supplied startDate plus the supplied days argument results in an invalid date.

#NUM!- occurs if the supplied [weekend] argument is invalid (see above explanation of this argument).

#VALUE! - occurs if the supplied startDate or any of the values in the supplied [holidays] array are not valid dates.

#VALUE! - occurs if the supplied days argument is non-numeric.

XIRR

Xirr function computes the internal rate-of-return for a schedule of possibly non-periodic cash flows.

Syntax

Xirr(cash flow, date list, value)

Where:

cash flow is the range of cash flow. date list is the list of serial number of the corresponding date values. value is an initial guess integer value which reflects in the result of the function.

XOR

XOR function returns the exclusive OR for the given arguments.

Syntax

XOR (logical_value1, logical_value2,…)

Where:

logical_value1: Required. This can be either TRUE or FALSE, and can be logical values, arrays, or references.

YEAR

Returns the year corresponding to a date. The year is returned as an integer in the range 1900-9999.

Syntax

YEAR(serial_number),

Where:

  • serial_number is the date of the year you want to find. Dates should be entered by using the DATE function or as results of other formulas or functions. For example, use DATE(2002,11,12) for the 12th day of November 2002.

YEARFRAC

The YEARFRAC function returns the fraction of a year that is represented by the number of whole days between two supplied dates.

Syntax

YEARFRAC( startDate, endDate, [basis] )

Where:

  • startDate is the start of the period.
  • endDate is the end of the period.
  • [basis] is an optional argument that specifies the type of day count basis to be used.

Remarks

#VALUE! - occurs if the startDate or endDate arguments are not valid dates.

#NUM!- occurs if the value of the supplied [basis] argument is less than 0 or greater than 4.

ZTEST

Returns the one-tailed probability-value of a z-test.

Syntax

ZTEST(array, u0, sigma)

Where:

  • array is the array or range of data against which to test u0
  • u0 is the value to test.
  • Sigma is the population (known) standard deviation. If omitted, the sample standard deviation is used.

Custom Functions

GridControl also supports adding custom functions in the function library. This section will explain how to add and remove functions in function library.

Add Function

A custom function can be added into the function library by using the AddFunction method but before adding the function it is necessary to create a new formula. The below steps needs to be followed to create and add a custom formula into the function library.

1.Define a method that has the below signature.

//Defines a method whose name is the Formula Name.
public string MyLibraryFormulaName(string args)
{
}
'Defines a method whose name is the Formula Name.
Public Function MyLibraryFormulaName(ByVal args As String) As String
End Function

Here MyLibraryFormulaName must be a name that has not already been used in Function Library and must include only letters and digits. Write the required implementation in this method.

The below code is used to implement a function that will sum only positive numbers that are passed in as either a range like A1:A5 or a list such as A1, A4, A10. The code uses the FormulaEngine helper method to extract these values from the cells.

The GetCellsFromArgs method will return an array of cells from a range such as A1:A5, and GetValueFromArg method will take cells such as A3 and return a value.

//Implements the desired method.
public string ComputeSumPosNumber(string args)
{
    GridFormulaCellModel model = this.gridControl1.CellModels["FormulaCell"] as GridFormulaCellModel;
    if (model != null)
    {
        GridFormulaEngine engine = model.Engine;
        double sum = 0d;
        double d;
        string s1;

//Loops through arguments and sum up the positive values.
        foreach (string r in args.Split(new char[] { ',' }))
        {
            //Cell Range.
            if (r.IndexOf(':') > -1)
            {
                foreach (string s in engine.GetCellsFromArgs(r))
                {
                    // s is a cell line a21 or c3...
                    try
                    {
                        s1 = engine.GetValueFromArg(s);
                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {
                        return ex.Message;
                    }
                    if (s1 != "")
                    {
                        //Adds only if positive.
                        if (double.TryParse(s1, NumberStyles.Number, null, out d) && d > 0)
                        {
                            sum += d;
                        }
                    }
                }

            }
            else
            {
                try
                {
                    s1 = engine.GetValueFromArg(r);
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    return ex.Message;
                }
                if (s1 != "")
                {
                    if (double.TryParse(s1, NumberStyles.Number, null, out d) && d > 0)
                    {
                        sum += d;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return sum.ToString();
    }
    return "";
}
Public Function ComputeSumPosNumber(ByVal args As String) As String
    Dim model As GridFormulaCellModel = TryCast(Me.gridControl1.CellModels("FormulaCell"), GridFormulaCellModel)
    If model IsNot Nothing Then
        Dim engine As GridFormulaEngine = model.Engine
        Dim sum As Double = 0R
        Dim d As Double
        Dim s1 As String

'Loops through arguments and sum up the positive values.
        For Each r As String In args.Split(New Char() { ","c })
            'Cell Range.
            If r.IndexOf(":"c) > -1 Then
                For Each s As String In engine.GetCellsFromArgs(r)
                    ' s is a cell line a21 or c3...
                    Try
                        s1 = engine.GetValueFromArg(s)
                    Catch ex As Exception
                        Return ex.Message
                    End Try
                    If s1 <> "" Then
                        'Adds only if positive.
                        If Double.TryParse(s1, NumberStyles.Number, Nothing, d) AndAlso d > 0 Then
                            sum += d
                        End If
                    End If
                Next s

            Else
                Try
                    s1 = engine.GetValueFromArg(r)
                Catch ex As Exception
                    Return ex.Message
                End Try
                If s1 <> "" Then
                    If Double.TryParse(s1, NumberStyles.Number, Nothing, d) AndAlso d > 0 Then
                        sum += d
                    End If
                End If
            End If
        Next r
        Return sum.ToString()
    End If
    Return ""
End Function

2.The created formula has to be added to the formula library. It has to be added after the Grid is initialized. The following code explains how to achieve it.

GridFormulaCellModel cellModel = this.gridControl1.CellModels["FormulaCell"] as GridFormulaCellModel;

//Adds a formula named SumPosNumber to the Library.
cellModel.Engine.AddFunction("SumPosNumber", new GridFormulaEngine.LibraryFunction(ComputeSumPosNumber));
Dim cellModel As GridFormulaCellModel = TryCast(Me.gridControl1.CellModels("FormulaCell"), GridFormulaCellModel)

'Adds a formula named SumPosNumber to the Library.
cellModel.Engine.AddFunction("SumPosNumber", New GridFormulaEngine.LibraryFunction(ComputeSumPosNumber))

Remove Function

To remove a single function from the Function Library, use the RemoveFunction method. Pass the function name as string in this method to remove it from the library.

// Remove formula name MyMin from the Library.
engine.RemoveFunction("MyMin");
' Remove formula name MyMin from the Library.
engine.RemoveFunction("MyMin")

Replace Function

To replace an existing function with another implementation, it is necessary to remove the original name, and add the same name again with a different delegate method.

//Removes the SUM function from the library.
cellModel.Engine.RemoveFunction("SUM");

//Add the function of SUM but with the name MySUM
cellModel.Engine.AddFunction("MySUM", cellModel.Engine.ComputeSum);
'Removes the SUM function from the library.
cellModel.Engine.RemoveFunction("SUM")

'Add the function of SUM but with the name MySUM
cellModel.Engine.AddFunction("MySUM", cellModel.Engine.ComputeSum)

Clear All Functions

It is possible to clear all the functions from the hash table that holds them by using the Engine.LibraryFunctions.Clear method. Removing unused functions from the function library, reduces the memory usage and speeds up parsing as well. It is also used to add only few selected libraries and can remove all the unwanted libraries.

// Removes all functions from the Library.
cellModel.Engine.LibraryFunctions.Clear();
'Removes all functions from the Library.
cellModel.Engine.LibraryFunctions.Clear()

New functions can be added after clearing all the functions from the function library. To know how to add functions, refer the [Add Function](#_Add_Function “”) topic.

Cross Sheet Reference

A formula cell can be defined with values from another grid by using cross sheet references. In this case, multiple grids can either be in worksheet format or multiple grids can be laid out in a form. This section explains on how to apply cross reference support between two grids.

Initially, register both the grids by using the staticRegisterGridAsSheet method. This method can be seen in theGridFormulaEngine class. Registering both the grids can be referenced in a formula from each other.

//Register the grid1 so it can be referenced in a formula from grid2.
GridFormulaEngine.RegisterGridAsSheet(this. gridControl1.Text, this. gridControl1.Model, 0);

//Register the grid2 so it can be referenced in a formula from grid1.
GridFormulaEngine.RegisterGridAsSheet(this. gridControl2.Text, this. gridControl2.Model, 0);
'Register the grid1 so it can be referenced in a formula from grid2.
GridFormulaEngine.RegisterGridAsSheet(Me. gridControl1.Text, Me. gridControl1.Model, 0)

'Register the grid2 so it can be referenced in a formula from grid1.
GridFormulaEngine.RegisterGridAsSheet(Me. gridControl2.Text, Me. gridControl2.Model, 0)

After registering, the values of grid1 can be accessed in the formula cell of grid by assigning the string "=gridControl1!B3 + B4" to that particular formula cell. Where grid1 denotes the name of the first grid. B3 + B4 denotes the formula.
For better understanding lets add two grids in a WinForms application. Register both the grids by using the above mentioned code. Now apply some values in the grid1.

this.gridControl1[3, 1].Text = "Salary1";
this.gridControl1[3, 2].Text = "2,000";
this.gridControl1[4, 1].Text = "Salary2";
this.gridControl1[4, 2].Text = "1,500";
Me.gridControl1(3, 1).Text = "Salary1"
Me.gridControl1(3, 2).Text = "2,000"
Me.gridControl1(4, 1).Text = "Salary2"
Me.gridControl1(4, 2).Text = "1,500"

Now compute the values for the grid2 by using the values in the grid1 by using the below code.

this.gridControl2[3, 2].Text = "Salary1";
this.gridControl2[4, 2].Text = "Salary2";
this.gridControl2[5, 2].Text = "Total";

// Assigning the cell type as formula cell
this.gridControl2[3, 3].CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell;

// Assigning the formula.
this.gridControl2[3, 3].Text = "=" + this.gridControl1.Text + "!C3";

// Assigning the cell type as formula cell
this.gridControl2[4, 3].CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell;

// Assigning the formula.
this.gridControl2[4, 3].Text = "=" + this.gridControl1.Text + "!C4";

// Assigning the cell type as formula cell
this.gridControl2[5, 3].CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell;

// Assigning the formula.
this.gridControl2[5, 3].Text = "=" + this.gridControl1.Text + "!C3 + C4";
Me.gridControl2(3, 2).Text = "Salary1"
Me.gridControl2(4, 2).Text = "Salary2"
Me.gridControl2(5, 2).Text = "Total"

'Assigning the cell type as formula cell
Me.gridControl2(3, 3).CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell

'Assigning the formula.
Me.gridControl2(3, 3).Text = "=" & Me.gridControl1.Text & "!C3"

' Assigning the cell type as formula cell
Me.gridControl2(4, 3).CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell

'Assigning the formula.
Me.gridControl2(4, 3).Text = "=" & Me.gridControl1.Text & "!C4"

'Assigning the cell type as formula cell
Me.gridControl2(5, 3).CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell

'Assigning the formula.
Me.gridControl2(5, 3).Text = "=" & Me.gridControl1.Text & "!C3 + C4"

Named Ranges

GridControl supports named ranges along with Grid Formula Engine. Named ranges let the users to set up names for expressions or ranges, and then use these names in formulas. For example, if the name of the range, B4:B12 is Expenses, then the formula =Sum(Expenses) can be used instead of =Sum(B4:B12).

For adding the custom name for a particular range, AddNamedRange property under the GridFormulaEngine has to be used.

GridFormulaEngine engine;
engine = ((GridFormulaCellModel)gridControl1.Model.CellModels["FormulaCell"]).Engine;
engine.AddNamedRange("Total", "A1:A3");
this.gridControl1[3, 3].CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell;
Dim engine As GridFormulaEngine
engine = (CType(gridControl1.Model.CellModels("FormulaCell"), GridFormulaCellModel)).Engine
engine.AddNamedRange("Total", "A1:A3")
Me.gridControl1(3, 3).CellType = GridCellTypeName.FormulaCell

After using the above code, the formula A1:A3 can be accessed in anywhere in a formula cell by just using the text Total.

NOTE

The following sample illustrates the use of Cross Sheet References and Named Ranges with Grid Formula Engine. <Install Location>\Syncfusion\EssentialStudio[Version Number]\Windows\Grid.Windows\Samples\Formula Support\Named Range Demo

Named Range Collection Editor

GridControl provides Named Range Collection Editor, in which it is possible to edit the named ranges. To display the Named Range Collection Editor make use of the method.

GridFormulaCellModel cellModel = this.gridControl1.CellModels["FormulaCell"] as GridFormulaCellModel;
GridFormulaNamedRangesEditHelper.ShowNamedRangesDialog(cellModel.Engine);
Dim cellModel As GridFormulaCellModel = TryCast(Me.gridControl1.CellModels("FormulaCell"), GridFormulaCellModel)
GridFormulaNamedRangesEditHelper.ShowNamedRangesDialog(cellModel.Engine)

In the dialog box all the named range members will be displayed in the left pane and their corresponding properties in the right pane. Previously a named range Total has been added and hence the named range dialog box shows the value Total by default. It is possible to add or remove the existing or custom ranges using this Named Range Collection Editor.

It is possible to edit the title of this editor by handling ShowingNamedRangesDialog event.

GridFormulaNamedRangesEditHelper.ShowingNamedRangesDialog += new ControlEventHandler(GridFormulaNamedRangesEditHelper_ShowingNamedRangesDialog);

//Event handler changes the title of Named Range Collection Editor dialog box.
void GridFormulaNamedRangesEditHelper_ShowingNamedRangesDialog(object sender, ControlEventArgs e)
{
    Form f = e.Control as Form;
    if (f != null)
    {

//Sets title for the dialog box.
        f.Text = "CashFlow Inputs";
    }   
}
AddHandler GridFormulaNamedRangesEditHelper.ShowingNamedRangesDialog, AddressOf GridFormulaNamedRangesEditHelper_ShowingNamedRangesDialog

'Event handler changes the title of Named Range Collection Editor dialog box.
Private Sub GridFormulaNamedRangesEditHelper_ShowingNamedRangesDialog(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As ControlEventArgs)
    Dim f As Form = TryCast(e.Control, Form)
    If f IsNot Nothing Then

'Sets title for the dialog box.
        f.Text = "CashFlow Inputs"
    End If
End Sub